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Alternate Reality Game Eavesdrops On Climate Changed Future

By Darrell Owens The year is 20XX: Dallas is covered in 30 inches of snow, San Francisco is experiencing mild tornadoes, and Greenland has become a tropical paradise. At least, this is what inhabitants of possible futures are saying in the new alternate reality game, Future Coast. Future Coast is the brainchild of game designer…

Pixar Producer Discusses Technology Behind Movie Animation

By: Bianca Brooks Insurance. That’s the field Oscar-nominated Pixar animator and visual effects director Andrew Jimenez credits for helping to make him the animator he is today. After studying film in college, he got an unglamorous insurance job, and that’s where he learned tools like Photoshop, which gave him the grounding he needed as an…

Brains and Beakers: Secrets Of Science Reporting

By Kendrick Calkins Alexis Madrigal has been called “the perfect modern reporter.” He’s written for The New York Times, Wired, and is now a senior editor of the Atlantic magazine, where he runs their technology section. He recently joined us at, Brains and Beakers, Youth Radio’s regular gathering where we hear from some of the biggest scientific thinkers, right…

Brains and Beakers: Raps on Science

By Chantell Williams A couple years ago I wrote a song about geography to the tune of Katy Perry’s Teenage Dream. I still remember every single word of that song… too embarrassing to actually write here, but it helped me pass my test. Music can help with learning and memory and can be used as…

Teen Genius Develops Cancer Test

By Donisha Dansby Jack Andraka is not your ordinary teenager. Instead of hanging out with friends or watching TV, Andraka prefers working in a lab, looking for a new way to detect cancer. The crazy thing is, he actually did! At just 16 Andraka has created a new tool to detect pancreatic cancer in its…

How Long Until a Drone of Your Own?

By Donta Jackson I met my first drone playing Call Of Duty: Black Ops. In the game, you can control one of these unmanned flying vehicles to hover and fire missiles to destroy enemy territory. In real life we also associate drones with death from above. The news constantly reminds us of their destructive power,…

Food Scientists Bring New Attention to Taste

Youth Radio invited author and food scientist Barb Stuckey to our studios to give us a taste of her book, Taste What You’re Missing. On the tables there were plates with multiple cups filled with unknown liquids, a jelly bean, some crackers, a strawberry, and a couple other small treats. I felt a little as…

Artists Make Music You Can See and Touch

When it comes to modern music, listening is only half the experience. From MTV special effects eye-candy to this year’s audio/tactile winner of the Google Science Fair, sound has become something not only to hear, but to see and touch. Youth Radio invited sound artist Sudhu Tewari to our studios for an exciting Brains and Beakers event…

Maker Lab Teaches Rockets, Circuits, and Soldering

Bicycle pump-powered rockets, lunch box speakers, and paper airplanes are just a few of the projects students have tackled in an after-school program launched by MAKE, a leader in the DIY movement that celebrates the “right to tweak, hack, and bend any technology to your will.”

What Air Pollution Sounds Like In L.A.

For some people, the phrase “emotional science” might call to mind the field of psychology or neuroscience. But when UC Berkeley new media professor Greg Niemeyer uses the term, it refers to presenting scientific data in a way that engages people’s feelings as much as their intellect. And sometimes the best way to get a person to feel something, is to get them to hear it.

In a High School Lab, Glimpses of an Ancient Climate

A big part of studying global warming is comparing today’s climate to that of the past. You probably know about the method of getting historic CO2 measurements from bubbles of air trapped in the ice of very old glaciers. But those ice core samples go back only 650,000 years. What we’re trying to do is extend that timeline much further back into the past — as in, 15 million years ago.