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March 9, 2014: Racing the Iditarod With Twins, Time Traveling to a Black Hole and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they ride 1,000 miles across Alaskan wilderness with a pack of dogs, hike quickly down the Appalachian Trail, lower scientists into sinkholes on tepuis, program robots to do household chores but not enslave the human race, break free of time on the edge of a black hole, be persecuted for our science, grow organic underwear, and explain evolution to children.

Crocodiles and Corals: Face-to-Face With Cuba’s Coral Reef

Giant yellow eyes stared me down, my own green eyes widened by our proximity. We watched each other blink.

Living Embers: Yaghan Art, Culture, and Bone Harpoons

What if thousands of years of your culture, your stories, your identity were reduced to ashes? What would you do? Martin Gonzalez, son of one of the last speakers and full-blooded Yaghan, Ursula Calderon, has a simple answer. Seek out the embers and ignite anew. I sit with Martin on a simple beach wood workbench…

2,100 Feet and Holding: Inside the Mind of a Submarine Pilot

There’s nothing between me and complete corporeal implosion but a 3 inch thick dome of plexiglass. What goes through the mind of a submarine pilot two thousand feet below the surface of the ocean? And better yet, what goes past the window?

How and Why Our Clothing Choices Matter

In a place where population growth is moving incredibly fast, added pressure on farmers in India in the wake of crushing debt and failed crops calls for a new agricultural approach. Genetic modification and organic farming present promising solutions. Young Explorer Andrew Flachs will investigate the effect of both growing strategies by interviewing farmers in Southern…

What Happened to the Fires of Tierra Del Fuego?

Young Explorer Will Meadows is building traditional canoes throughout the world’s ecosystems and indigenous communities, using the vessel as a lens into culture, identity, art, environment, and innovation. —- Mountains of ice, vast, frigid, and treacherous waters, deep, dense, mud and earth, Tierra Del Fuego is a land of elements. Yet the Land of Fire…

NG Young Explorer Behind the Scenes: The Good, the Bad, and the Unforgettable

National Geographic Young Explorers Grantee Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of…

Audio Story: To Walk Into the Storm

(Audio Story) “You are privileged to walk this.” It’s amazing how such a simple statement ripped me apart. Give me rain, wind, and hail — I’ll persist! But what happens when I can’t answer why I persist?

As a National Geographic Young Explorer, Jay walked over 400 miles in the mountains of South Africa, completing the first trek of the entire Rim of Africa Mountain Trail, to help educate South African youth on the Cape Floristic Region and conservation through the story of creating Africa’s first Mega-Trail.

Fieldwork – Or How To Still Explore The World À La Indiana Jones

National Geographic Young Explorer Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of opportunity,…

Severe Erosion Reveals Earth’s Treasures

National Geographic Young Explorer Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of opportunity,…

December 29, 2013: Rescuing Crocs, Navy Seals in Zoos, Swimming with Great Whites, Blackfish and More

Join host National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson and his guests as they try to save man-eating crocs from angry villagers, meet a retired Navy seal at Washington’s National Zoo, find out the dark secrets of performing orcas at Sea World, swim face to face with great white sharks, and survive avalanches by avoiding them.

A Christmas of the Coastal Kind

What made this Christmas so special wasn’t at all a particular tradition or exotic celebration of any notable kind. Instead, it was simply a continuation of business-as-usual, another day in a life where the sea gives only to the extent that one shows up. So on this year’s Christmas day, everyone showed up as they did yesterday, as they will tomorrow, and as they will for every other day of the year.

Journey Behind The Lens: Dodging Madagascar’s Plague Outbreak

The bubonic plague is something that not many people give much thought to these days. This is understandable, since it has been largely eradicated from the realities of the 21st century, save for a very few remote pockets on the globe. So I was a bit surprised when someone told me that east of where I was doing fieldwork in northern Madagascar, a village was being hit with a deadly plague outbreak.

Exploring Some of the Earliest Evidence of Human Occupation in Island Southeast Asia

First explored by western archaeologists in the 1960s, two Young Explorers tour Timor-Leste’s Lene Hara cave.

The Bitter And The Sweet: Finding Opportunity in the Life Cycle of Erosion

Young Explorer Alizé Carrère searches for a silver lining in what might otherwise be a tale of irreversible hardship.