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Equality for Women and Sustainable Development Go Hand in Hand

Half of the world’s farmers are women, but women only own about one percent of the world’s land. Similarly, women make up nearly 50 percent of the global fisheries workforce, but in most countries have little to no say in how fisheries are managed. These statistics are indicative of a more general trend: women’s interests and roles are seldom seriously considered in the design and implementation of rural development and conservation initiatives.

Women Connect to Boost Resilience of Planet

By Jensine Larsen Women everywhere are claiming power and linking networks to restore the Earth and address climate change. They are harnessing digital media and in-person convenings to accelerate the movement, operating as an immune system to boost the Earth’s resilience.   It was that moment on stage when Jane Goodall turned to Vandana Shiva and…

In Her Words: Sylvia Earle on Women in Science

National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Sylvia Earle reflects on her scientific career and on gender obstacles she faced along the way.

International Women’s Day: Photos and Quotes From Women Explorers

Celebrate International Women’s Day with great quotes from women explorers, and learn about the inspirational work they’re doing.

Why Do Women Talk So Much?

Because their brains may be built that way. So says a University of Maryland School of Medicine study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, which found that young girls have a greater abundance of a protein that’s associated with language development in mammals. And this might explain why men tend to be less talkative than…

February 3, 2013: Paddle Boarding Down Waterfalls, Searching for Venomous Snakes, and More

Join National Geographic Weekend radio show this week, as we kayak off waterfalls, refuse to run from charging lions, and treat disease with venom from some of the most poisonous snakes around.

Kumbh Mela 2013: Lost and Found

There is a stubborn rumour here at the Kumbh Mela that some people come to abandon elderly female relatives and children in the crowd. There are two lost and found camps on site, one of which is run by 86-year-old Raja Ram Tiwari, who took the initiative after seeing an old woman weeping uncontrollably at…

3 Holidays in 2 Months, Omani Dress and Traditions on Full Display

The autumn of 2012 in the Sultanate of Oman was a full display of celebration, custom, and color with coinciding important festivals.

Ada Lovelace Day Celebrates Women in Science

    Today, the 16th of October, is Ada Lovelace Day. You’d be forgiven for not having heard of Ada Lovelace, or of this celebration each October. It’s one of the more unusual dates, but if you’re one of the many (yet still minority of) women in science, this is a day you recognize, and…

August 5, 2012: Speed Scaling El Capitan, Teaching Women to Film in Afghanistan, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we set a speed record on Yellowstone’s El Capitan, help Native North Americans rediscover their culture and tell their own stories, save physics with LSD, survey the wreckage of Japan’s tsunami on Washington’s coast, walk the length of the Andes, start a revolution in the Middle East by using photography, speak the language of London’s east side, and find America’s best beaches.

Sally Ride: A Source of Inspiration

Whenever someone meets me, it doesn’t take them long to ask me the question, “How did you get so into space?” Given that I’ve likely just worked the space shuttle into a conversation about owls or mentioned a solar flare as part of ordering a pizza, it’s not surprising. It could have been all the…

Closing the mobile technology “gender gap”

At the Networked Society Forum in Hong Kong last November, I sat and listened as Jeffrey Sachs described mobile connectivity as “the single most important instrument for development that we have“. Few people would disagree. A recent study by the GSM Association reported a 10% increase in mobile phone use leads to a 1.2% increase…

Sentence Handed Down in Afghan Child Bride Case

The in-laws of Sahar Gul, a 15-year-old Afghan child bride, have been sentenced in an Afghan court to 10 years. Gul was imprisoned by her in-laws in a basement and then tortured, including being burned and having her fingernails pulled out, in an effort to force her to become a prostitute.