National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for winter

Studies Focus on Warming of Oceans

Oceans absorb carbon dioxide and 90 percent of the heat caused by human activity—making their warming a critical topic for climate research. Two new studies—one on the upper oceans and one on deeper ocean depths—share findings about climate change’s effect on these water bodies. The first study, in the journal Nature Climate Change, provides the first estimate of…

5 Surprising Facts About Squirrels (Hint: They Make Jerky)

As squirrels in the Northern Hemisphere hoard food for winter, we take a look at the industrious and diverse rodents, which can range from a half an ounce to 20 pounds.

Slovenia’s Winter Carnivale Draws a Woolly, Colorful Crowd

National Geographic grantee Riley Arthur is documenting the Erased of Slovenia- 25,000+ non-ethnic Slovenian residents were left without legal status after the country split from Yugoslavia in 1991. Over two decades later, the community is still fighting for documentation. These stories are about the Erased and the places they live.  —- February in Slovenia is…

In Praise of Silence

In the past twelve years, I’ve made many winter trips to this area of the American Prairie Reserve and every time, when the wind calms, I’m still caught off guard by the lack of sound, any sound, for miles.

A Wild Life at 40 Below: Working on a Snow-Covered American Serengeti

When you think about modern day adventurers, how many of them live and work in the continental United States? On American Prairie Reserve, our staff spend their lives submersed in the grassland ecosystem in all seasons. As winter rolls in across the plains, extreme weather teaches us a lot about what it means to survive…

Sperm Works Best in the Winter, Study Finds

Spring may be when a young man’s fancy turns to love, but new evidence suggests that it’s winter when his sperm is at its spunkiest.

HOW MANY GRIZZLIES ARE ENOUGH?

“Bears force us to think hard about what we really mean when we say we want to preserve nature. A sample here and there? Multitudes of certain majestic creatures but only token numbers of others – just enough to let us say we didn’t drive them completely extinct?” – Douglas H. Chadwick

Mars Rovers’ “Ancestor” Celebrates 35 Years

August 20, 1975: A Titan 3/Centaur rocket launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, carrying the Viking 1 spacecraft, the first NASA mission to put a lander on Mars. Moments after touchdown on July 20, 1976, Viking 1 sent the first-ever picture taken from the surface of the red planet: A portrait of the artist as a…

NASA to Check Whether Phoenix Survived the Winter

No, Arizona, the space agency will not be making a visit to your lovely but likely unharmed state capital. Instead, scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are hoping against hope that the Phoenix Mars Lander might have somehow made it through harsh winter conditions at its final resting place in the Martian arctic. Phoenix amid…

Phoenix, Gone But Not Forgotten

Great stars don’t die, they just fade away. It’s been almost two months since NASA lost contact with the Phoenix Mars Lander, which had been studying icy soils near the red planet’s north pole. The lander’s surface stereo imager made a mosaic to show the craft from a few feet in the air—that black spot…