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Top 20 Photos of 2013 from American Prairie Reserve

Looking back over a year’s worth of photos, the prairie weaves an ever-changing tale of drama, peace, microscopic detail, magnitude, and resilience. The seasons become less defined, and the decade I’ve spent helping build American Prairie Reserve blends in a single, long journey. As you scroll through our snapshots from the field, I hope you get…

Alberta’s Heritage of Wildlife and Headwaters Up for Grabs

Many important areas would remain un-protected in the Alberta government’s draft Regional Plan, which would establish new Wildland Parks in about 25% of the area. In fact, the government’s proposed parks would cover only a small portion of each species’ vital habitat. Several of the more productive habitats along the upper river valleys and higher tributaries would be excluded from protection.

A Wild Life at 40 Below: Working on a Snow-Covered American Serengeti

When you think about modern day adventurers, how many of them live and work in the continental United States? On American Prairie Reserve, our staff spend their lives submersed in the grassland ecosystem in all seasons. As winter rolls in across the plains, extreme weather teaches us a lot about what it means to survive…

Ferrets In the Night – Recovery Efforts Continue for Masked Bandits in Montana

The region of the American Prairie Reserve encompasses two national wildlife refuges. This is an area of Montana with dramatic cliffs cut by the Missouri River and rugged, wooded terrain housing mountain lions, elk and big horn sheep. As you move up from the river and north across the prairie, an expansive network of ecologically…

Be Part of One of the Largest Conservation Efforts in American History

You can participate in one of the largest conservation efforts in American history! Join Landmark and use your skills and passion to protect one of the last remaining sanctuaries of its kind in the world. Crews will consist of six-person teams of adventurers and have the opportunity to spend a month exploring one of the most uncharted sections of the American Great Plains.

Climbing the Big Mountain: Cameras Fail, Views Amaze, and Souls Are Restored in Bhadra

A 4-year-old and her explorer mother scale a mountain with high hopes for high tech equipment, but come away with something more valuable.

Tech & the Cheetah

Some regions of Kenya have better cell phone reception than the heart of San Francisco’s financial district.  This is no exaggeration.  One can easily make a call or text from the Maasai Mara National Reserve.  It’s changed the country’s economy, society in both rural and urban areas, and launched millions of voices onto Twitter and…

Riding the Lewis & Clark Trail In Search of Roadkill

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Gregg Treinish founded Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, a nonprofit organization connecting outdoor adventurers with scientists in need of data from the field. He also organizes his own expeditions, contributing to research on wildlife-human interaction, fragmented habitats, and threatened species. In that spirit, his blog posts appear both here on Explorers Journal and in Beyond the Edge, the…

Elvis the Dog Sniffs Out Pregnant Polar Bears

Elvis the beagle is helping North American zoo keepers figure out if their polar bears are pregnant or not.

Celebrating National Bison Day with Lewis and Clark

On National Bison day today, we are reminded of the magnificent role that bison play in the prairie ecosystem. Oral history, diaries and journals, and paintings by early explorer/artists like George Catlin tell us that large herds of bison were awe-inspiring (and intimidating) sights. Imagine standing on the high cliffs above the Missouri River and…

Competing Hunters Turn Friends? Wolf and Bear Share Dinner at Sunset

A gray wolf and a brown bear have been photographed hanging out together in Finland.

The Impact of Energy Development on the Environment: A Look at Wildlife with Dr. Michael Hutchins

As much as I was awed by the poverty-stricken nation of India on a recent visit, and what many westerners would consider deplorable conditions, I was impressed by the country’s “green movement,” which is rapidly emerging on the subcontinent. South Asia’s largest nation will soon surpass China as the most populated country in the world—a…

Mass Poisonings Devastate African Wildlife, Incite “Urgent Measures”

The recent mass poisoning of vultures has prompted the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism to propose urgent legislation that would ban over-the-counter sales of poisons and pesticides. (Read more: Elephant Poachers Poison Hundreds of Vultures to Evade Authorities) Further investigations have revealed that over 1,000 vultures may have perished in this single incident.  While this…

10 Ways National Geographic Has Changed the World

National Geographic magazine’s 125th anniversary issue is out on newsstands this month. As we take a look back at our legacy so far, here are just a few of the ways that National Geographic has changed the world.

Marching to Save the Elephant on October 4

“Whoever has seen these giants marching across the last free open spaces of the world knows that this is something that must not be lost.” – Romain Gary, The Roots of Heaven Several years ago, Marie and I began to mourn the tragic dismembering of elephant society across Africa, an act that caused us to…