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Climbing the Big Mountain: Cameras Fail, Views Amaze, and Souls Are Restored in Bhadra

A 4-year-old and her explorer mother scale a mountain with high hopes for high tech equipment, but come away with something more valuable.

Tech & the Cheetah

Some regions of Kenya have better cell phone reception than the heart of San Francisco’s financial district.  This is no exaggeration.  One can easily make a call or text from the Maasai Mara National Reserve.  It’s changed the country’s economy, society in both rural and urban areas, and launched millions of voices onto Twitter and…

Riding the Lewis & Clark Trail In Search of Roadkill

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Gregg Treinish founded Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, a nonprofit organization connecting outdoor adventurers with scientists in need of data from the field. He also organizes his own expeditions, contributing to research on wildlife-human interaction, fragmented habitats, and threatened species. In that spirit, his blog posts appear both here on Explorers Journal and in Beyond the Edge, the…

Elvis the Dog Sniffs Out Pregnant Polar Bears

Elvis the beagle is helping North American zoo keepers figure out if their polar bears are pregnant or not.

Celebrating National Bison Day with Lewis and Clark

On National Bison day today, we are reminded of the magnificent role that bison play in the prairie ecosystem. Oral history, diaries and journals, and paintings by early explorer/artists like George Catlin tell us that large herds of bison were awe-inspiring (and intimidating) sights. Imagine standing on the high cliffs above the Missouri River and…

Competing Hunters Turn Friends? Wolf and Bear Share Dinner at Sunset

A gray wolf and a brown bear have been photographed hanging out together in Finland.

The Impact of Energy Development on the Environment: A Look at Wildlife with Dr. Michael Hutchins

As much as I was awed by the poverty-stricken nation of India on a recent visit, and what many westerners would consider deplorable conditions, I was impressed by the country’s “green movement,” which is rapidly emerging on the subcontinent. South Asia’s largest nation will soon surpass China as the most populated country in the world—a…

Mass Poisonings Devastate African Wildlife, Incite “Urgent Measures”

The recent mass poisoning of vultures has prompted the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism to propose urgent legislation that would ban over-the-counter sales of poisons and pesticides. (Read more: Elephant Poachers Poison Hundreds of Vultures to Evade Authorities) Further investigations have revealed that over 1,000 vultures may have perished in this single incident.  While this…

10 Ways National Geographic Has Changed the World

National Geographic magazine’s 125th anniversary issue is out on newsstands this month. As we take a look back at our legacy so far, here are just a few of the ways that National Geographic has changed the world.

Marching to Save the Elephant on October 4

“Whoever has seen these giants marching across the last free open spaces of the world knows that this is something that must not be lost.” – Romain Gary, The Roots of Heaven Several years ago, Marie and I began to mourn the tragic dismembering of elephant society across Africa, an act that caused us to…

Searching for Nesting Sea Turtles on Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula

Conservation Trust grantee Brad Nahill, co-founder of SEE Turtles, is working to protect endangered sea turtles by growing the market for conservation travel to support small conservation programs around the world. SEE Turtles also connects volunteers to conservation projects and educates students both in the US and near key turtle nesting sites around Latin America. —–…

Okavango Expedition 2013: On the Edge of Wilderness

Eleven wattled cranes, hundreds of spur-winged geese, saddle-billed stork everywhere, cormorants, egrets, a multitude of fish eagles, and a whiskered tern fishing in front of a blood red sun… On the edge of the wilderness again and all on the research team are transfixed by the scene, this wonderful Okavango Delta. In a way all…

The Sad Ballad of Menes, the Egyptian #Spyduck

Menes wasn’t a spy, and neither was he a duck. Thanks to a combination of xenophobic paranoia and spotty Arabic-to-English translation, this one-year-old White Stork was unfairly painted as both and clapped into jail.

Days later he was exonerated, released, and eaten.

Serengeti Animal GIFs Now Set to Music

Last week, we posted 18 animated GIFs of wild animals, which we put together from images captured by camera traps by Snapshot Serengeti (read about how the images were made). Today, we saw that a Vimeo user called Japenet has looped those GIFs into a video, complete with a new rockin’ soundtrack. Enjoy the treatment…

18 Amazing, Intimate Camera Trap GIFs of Serengeti Animals

Biologist Craig Packer has headed the Serengeti Lion Project since 1978. The director of the Lion Research Center and Distinguished McKnight University Professor at the University of Minnesota has spent countless hours on the Serengeti plains, studying lion ecology, genetics, health, and other factors. (Hear some of Packer’s expert commentary in the interactive Serengeti Lion experience and read more in “The Short Happy…