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Unexpected Conservation Connection Between Montana, Azerbaijan and the United Arab Emirates

My wife Kayla and I, after decades of living in Montana, made a rookie mistake last month as we tried, on a week’s notice, to secure a three-night spot at one of our favorite camping areas. We figured the second week of July would be a perfect time for relaxing and wildlife watching. Apparently so…

Poaching Crisis in Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photo from iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton. UPDATE FROM THE FIELD: Paul Hilton and FKL Rangers Expose Wildlife Poaching in…

Dead and Lost Boobies: Harbingers of a Growing El Niño?

Starving seabirds far from home may point to a brewing El Nino in the Pacific.

Climate Change Joins Lions and Livestock in an Unlikely Partnership

In the coming years, climate change will transform the world in ways that we have not predicted. The king of the big cats has already survived two major periods of change, but with humans quickly taking over valuable grassland habitat, will they be able to survive another? On the Maasai Steppe of Tanzania, lions have…

Oregon Wild Calls for Northwest Forestland Preservation and Climate Change Mitigation

As a week old Oregonian, I received an unprecedented and gracious orientation of sorts—a “call of the wild” from the Pacific Northwest, if you will. I was invited to attend the Wilderness Conference hosted by Oregon Wild. Oregon Wild (formerly the Oregon Natural Resources Council or ONRC) hosted an event, celebrating just over 40 years as…

Wetlands Do Triple Duty in a Changing Climate

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Restoration of natural infrastructure like freshwater wetlands should become a key piece of our national climate change adaptation strategy.

Geography in the News: Tragic Deaths of Amphibians

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Dying Frogs, Salamanders, and Other Amphibians A deadly fungus is attacking Earth’s amphibian species. Unfortunately, the disease seems to be winning and its price may be the extinction of frogs, toads and salamanders. The disease, called chytridiomycosis, or chytrid for short, has been decimating…

The Ocean Comes to Sacramento

Sometimes California gets it right. When it comes to protecting its coast and ocean, the state’s citizens guarantee that. March 24 will mark the 7th annual Ocean Day in Sacramento with dozens of marine conservation activists from Environment California, Heal the Bay, Surfrider, Coastkeeper Alliance and others descending on the Statehouse from up and down…

Signs of Spring on American Prairie Reserve

By Damien Austin Freezing rain has left inches of ice across a snow-crusted prairie. A few days from now the creeks will be running high as warm weather moves in to unravel the layers of winter. It’s also the time of year when my two young daughters stand at the kitchen windows with their faces…

Why Adoption of the Medical Model Would Cure Conservation Impact Evaluation

Whether it is using scuba and snorkel surveys to track changes in coral reef health, systematic ranger and ecoguard patrolling to enforce wildlife laws and prevent crime, expert opinion interviews to assess strengths and weakness of natural resource governance, or household surveys to measure the livelihoods of families who share the landscapes in which we work, increasingly conservation organizations are committed to ensuring we measure what we manage.

Wolf Tracks Found on Mt. Hood, First Since 1947

Oregon wolf and wildlife advocates celebrated yesterday with confirmation of wolf tracks found on the eastern foothills of Oregon’s Mt. Hood. This is the first sign of a wolf in the Cascades Range since the famous Wolf OR-7 made headlines for visiting in 2011. Details of the December wolf-track spotting comes from Oregon Fish and Wildlife’s recently released 2013 Annual Report for Wolf Conservation and Management, among other indications of a recovering wolf population.

Landmark Adventure Science: public access to a cherished landscape leads to open access data

With temperatures hovering around minus 21 degrees Fahrenheit, six outdoor enthusiasts gear up for volunteer training on American Prairie Reserve. The blue skies and sunshine are deceptive. Standing too long in these temperatures will create a chill in one’s body that is hard to shake, no matter how much physical exertion is expended. The orientation…

On the Trail of the Pygmy Raccoon

by Kevin Schafer / iLCP No, this is not your average raccoon.  And that, precisely, is the point of this story.  For one of the world’s most endangered carnivores has had the misfortune of looking like a common neighborhood pest – the raccoon. But the Pygmy Raccoon of Mexico’s Cozumel Island is not at all…

PHOTOS: 5 Animals That Outsmart Winter on the Northern Plains

While parts of the U.S. bundle up for extreme winter weather, the animals on American Prairie Reserve (APR) have enjoyed several warm weeks in January. Since my last trip to the Reserve earlier this month, our staff and volunteer adventure scientists have spotted bison, mule deer, and large groups of pronghorn moving with ease across the…

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK): An Interview With Dr. Michael Hutchins

The following interview is my 12th in a series with my esteemed colleague Dr. Michael Hutchins. Michael recently joined the American Bird Conservancy, as the organization’s National Bird Smart Wind Campaign Coordinator. The distinguished ecologist has agreed to answer my questions about indigenous knowledge and the impact of such informational resources on the management of…