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Tag archives for wetlands

America Resilient

Since we last celebrated Earth Day a year ago, 29 states have experienced 99 Federal disaster declarations. Fires, floods, mudslides, hurricanes, and tornadoes have devastated the United States, causing billions of dollars of damage, destroying thousands of homes, and up-ending people’s lives.

Worst Weather Ever: Has It Become a Cliché Yet?

The troubles of Poyang Lake, China’s largest freshwater lake, are getting drowned out by the clamor generated by the superstorms Typhoon Haiyan and Cyclone Phailin. A crisis is still a crisis, however, even if it is not punctuated by 150mph winds and catastrophic flooding. Poyang’s water levels ebb and flow according to the season. In…

Migration by Any Means Necessary

The airplane passenger of the month for October was an unusual breed of traveler, one who gratefully received first-class airfare even though the ticket sent him more than 2,000 km out of his way. He was trying to head south for the winter, got lost along the way, and has ended up with winter accommodations near…

Flocking to Fallon

I’m no twitcher, and before last weekend the closest I’d ever come to the world of birding was watching the surprising blockbuster The Big Year. But that all changed when I plunged into the 16th Annual Spring Wing’s Festival. The event draws thousands of birders from all over the globe to Fallon, Nevada, a small…

A Day in the Lush Mobile Delta

  By Mark J. Spalding, President, The Ocean Foundation One recent Monday, I got to spend the day doing something outside, not in a conference room, not in my office, just out in one of North America’s great natural wonders. My day began at 7, when the executive director of the Mobile Botanical Gardens, Bill…

Once a Smelly Nuisance, Mexicali’s Wastewater Now Brings Life to the Colorado Delta

This post is part of a series on the Colorado River Delta. If there is one place that transforms wastewater from trouble-maker to life-saver it’s the site of Las Arenitas sewage treatment plant in the Mexican state of Baja California. There, nasty urban wastewater that once made a smelly health hazard of the New River near…

The Accidental Wetland in the Colorado Delta

This post is part of a series on the Colorado River Delta. Traveling south from the Mexican border town of San Luis Rio Colorado, we stop about 20 miles (32.2 km) from the Upper Gulf of California.  It feels like the middle of nowhere. We’re surrounded by vast stretches of cracked, dried-out mudflats layered with…

The Treasures of Tursujuq: one of North America’s largest national parks

With little fanfare, the Inuit people of Nunavik in northern Quebec, the Grand Council of the Cree, and the Government of Quebec announced the creation of Tursujuq National Park—a 6.5 million acre protected area along the eastern shore of Hudson Bay. Not only is this remarkable for its size—it’s the largest protected area in eastern North America and one of the top 10 largest parks on the continent—but perhaps even more incredible is that the park is several million acres larger than it had been expected to be a few years ago.

Wetlands: Freshwater “Species” of the Week

In case you weren’t aware, every February 2 is not just Groundhog Day. It is also World Wetlands Day.   From the official website of World Wetlands Day: This day marks the date of the adoption of the Convention on Wetlands on 2 February 1971, in the Iranian city of Ramsar on the shores of the…

Third Day in the Field, First Crash

Third day into the expedition, the team took their quadcopter for an unintentional bumpy ride-and caught it all on tap.

The Last Untamed Mexican River

An incredible journey to preserve the last untamed Mexican River: the San Pedro Mezquital.

Greening Diplomacy with Cuba

I had an opportunity to visit Cuba in May 2012 under a licensed program with the Vermont Caribbean Institute. This article is a follow-up effort to learn and engage with other environmental researchers yearning for more cooperation between the United States and Cuba. I have not dealt with the political aspects of the conflict between…

Who’s Naughty and Who’s Nice: A Year After the Everglades Big Sugar Deal

Your celebration this season is, in part, brought to you by southern Florida, where almost 50 percent of the nation’s sugarcane crop comes from.

Mississippi Floods Can Be Restrained With Natural Defenses

As the Mississippi River threatens to deliver devastating floods (again), it’s time to enlist wetlands to reduce future flood risks.

Putting the Extremely Rare Wyoming Toad Back Into the Wild

By Jordan Schaul Bree Barney loves her job, she really does! The small mammal keeper, like many, has a few miscellaneous reptiles and amphibians on her string. She boasts about getting to hold sloths and feeding Galapagos tortoises, but is most proud of the Como Park Zoo and Conservancy‘s participation in their first-ever conservation project…