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The Unsung Heroes of the Colorado River Delta Pulse Flow

This spring, the gates were opened at Morelos Dam, the furthest downstream in a string of infrastructure along the Colorado River that store and divert water to people and industries throughout the basin.  Sitting approximately 100 river miles upstream of the Sea of Cortez, Morelos Dam has been the southern terminus of the Colorado River…

EPA Power Plant Rule Deadline Approaching

Next month, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will issue a proposed rule that sets the first-ever carbon emissions standards for the country’s existing power plants. The rule, to be announced by President Barack Obama, is rumored to include a phased approach leading to steeper emissions limits over time. Though little has formally come out about the rule,…

The Colorado River Flows to the Sea

This week, the Colorado River will be reunited with the sea – a destination it hasn’t seen in many years – thanks to the “pulse flow.” Scientists monitoring the flow expect the two waters to meet sometime tomorrow, during high tide, but it’s actually possible that the river reached the sea last week, as we…

May 11, 2014: Capturing the Spirit of Adventure, Saving Sea Turtles and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 – Adventurers who regularly push their limits of…

Federal Climate Assessment Report Pegs Climate Change as Culprit for Rising Temperatures, Seas

A new federal scientific report, out Tuesday, concluded that global warming is affecting the United States in profound ways and that human activity, namely the burning of fossil fuels, is the primary cause of warming over the past 50 years. Mandated by Congress and written by a federal advisory panel, the more than 800-page National Climate Assessment further says that the…

Fishing in the Gene Pool for New Species

  By Matthew Frank  One day last summer, Michael LeMoine, a Ph.D. candidate in fisheries biology at the University of Montana, carried a nondescript cardboard box into the Missoula FedEx office. Inside it was a jar of ethanol containing a single specimen of a new species of a type of fish called a sculpin. The…

Tamping Down on Water Use in Drought Stricken California

By Meg Wilcox, Senior Manger, Communications, Ceres The Dawn Creek subdivision in Lancaster, 60 miles north of Los Angeles, looks like any other neighborhood scattered across California’s Antelope Valley. Its neatly arrayed modern homes blend into the arid landscape, sporting hues the colors of the desert—burnt umber, sienna and ecru. But Dawn Creek contains a…

Tracking the World’s Largest Salmon With Sonar

  Onishibetsu, Japan – I’ve learned to be patient.  A skill honed as an obsessed fly fisherman years ago. Lately, though, I don’t use a rod and reel to stalk fish.  The challenge of “catching” them with sonar I find much more gratifying.  Consider it the most benign form of “catch and release.” I’m in a…

Cleaning Up Maryland’s Little Falls Branch Creek

By Jo Dickison April 12th was a perfect day for a creek cleanup event. The morning air was crisp and the Little Falls Branch Creek in suburban Maryland was sparkling in the warm spring sun. The stream cleanup is an annual event hosted by the Westmoreland Hills Garden Club, Montgomery County Parks M-NCPPC (Maryland-National Capital Park…

Nature Responds to Colorado River Delta Pulse Flow

The Colorado River has been flowing in its delta for more than three weeks, thanks to a cooperative effort by the United States and Mexico to deliver a “pulse flow” of water. The pulse flow is meant to mimic – albeit at a small scale – the spring floods that historically inundated the delta and…

Mining in El Salvador: Can Corporate Behaviour be Changed?

Guest article by Vladimir Pacheco Central America remains a land of tremendous potential but persistent poverty. In vulnerable states recovering from civil strife and growing inequality, foreign corporate investment has additional obligations to ensure community consent through patient engagement. In this guest article, Vladimir Pacheco, a social scientist who has worked on mining and human…

Update From Colorado River Delta: A Community Gets its River Back

For more than two weeks, the Colorado River has been flowing in its delta, through more than 30 miles (48 kilometers) of recently bone-dry river channel choked with desert scrub.  The flow is all too brief, lasting only eight weeks in all.  The United States and Mexico are demonstrating how a “pulse flow” of water…

San Joaquin River Named #1 Most Endangered River in the U.S.

American Rivers today released its annual report of America’s Most Endangered Rivers, with California’s San Joaquin River at the top of the list.  Outdated water management, compounded by the current drought, have put the San Joaquin River at a critical crossroads. It is hard to overstate the importance of the San Joaquin River and its…

Partnership Protects America’s Largest Native Trout in Dry Nevada

By John Zablocki and Zeb Hogan Few places in the world keep their secrets as well as Northern Nevada.  Ask anyone driving across the northern half of the state along U.S. Highway 50 (widely referred to as the “Loneliest Road in America”) what they saw, and the most common reply will be “a whole-lot-of-nothin’.”  From…

Building a Resilient Water Portfolio

By Robert B. Sowby People often ask me, “So what’s the answer to the world’s water problems?” and expect an easy, digestible response. But there is no silver bullet. While most water plans have a dominant component, dependence on a single strategy is risky. Climate change, population growth, and other 21st-century challenges can adversely impact…