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Tag archives for Washington

On the Trail of the Elusive Pacific Marten

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Gregg Treinish founded Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, a nonprofit organization connecting outdoor adventurers with scientists in need of data from the field. He also organizes his own expeditions, contributing to research on wildlife-human interaction, fragmented habitats, and threatened species.  —- We rolled into the driveway at the USFS house in Hoodsport, WA at about…

Spadefoot Toad and Other Weird State Symbols

Louisiana’s official crustacean? Crayfish. New Mexico’s honored amphibian? The spadefoot toad. See what other states have quirky symbols to show their pride.

February 23, 2014: Cycling to the South Pole, Saving India’s Killer Tigers and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they endure a 750-mile bike ride from Antarctica’s coast to the South Pole, explore the sonic wonders of the world, explain the Yukon’s modern-day gold rush, fly south for the winter with snowy owls, empower Bolivia’s rural citizens to protect their corner of the world, kayak the length of the Colorado and Green Rivers, recover from unpleasant tropical parasites, advocate for tigers and humans when species clash in India, track Turkey’s bears by cellphone.

January 26, 2014: Riding Rio Roosevelt’s Rapids, Sliding Headfirst at 90 MPH and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson and his guests as they paddle Class V rapids on the River of Doubt, hand cycle the length of the Americas, investigate deaths from common drugs, preserve lions’ disappearing prides, slide headfirst down an icy track at 90 miles per hour, and reconcile the future and the past in the Amazon Rainforest.

A Defining Statue of Ataturk

On December 5, 2013 Nelson Mandela died, one of the most successful fighters for social justice in history. Cut from the same cloth as Mahatma Gandhi, he helped to liberate his nation from racial and colonial oppression, and went on to unify his nation. Mandela had started his decades of struggles as a militant, though…

September 29, 2013: Photographing Every Animal in Captivity, Saving Apes from Guerillas, and More

Join us this week, as we set a world record kayaking 151 miles in 24 hours, then build an Ark to help save all of the world’s animals, teach pandas to breed successfully, and finally, rekindle old friendships with indigenous people in Nepal after 45 years apart.

September 22, 2013: Paddling the Americas, Blind Date Adventures, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, as we pursue adrenaline and white water throughout the Americas, blind date for 200 miles down Alaska’s Lost Coast, and learn to thrive despite past failures.

Interactive Map Color-Codes Race of Every Single American

It sounds somewhat implausible, but a University of Virginia academic has designed an interactive map that color-codes the geographic distribution of every single American, drawing on the last census. The Racial Dot Map uses 308,745,538 blue, green, red, and other colored dots to represent the race of every American in the place that person lives.…

DC Welcomes Space Shuttle Discovery

  After a few false alarms caused by jets leaving Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, the crowd was finally rewarded with a view of the low-flying 747, piggybacking Space Shuttle Discovery, en route to a Smithsonian hangar. Cheers erupted through the jammed road and park in front of the White House. The carrier roared across…

Full Moon Over Washington

Team Edward or Team Jacob?

    The latest movie in the Twilight saga, Breaking Dawn–Part 1, was just released with the 5th-best opening weekend ever, according to an Entertainment Weekly report. The saga follows the love triangle of a human girl, Bella, and the vampire (Edward) and werewolf (Jacob) who are in love with her. The characters live in the small…

The Original Plans for 9/11

By Patrick J. Kiger As horrifyingly deadly and destructive as the September 11 attacks on New York and Washington were, it’s perhaps even more chilling to realize that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the Kuwaiti Al Qaeda operative who has been indicted for planning the attacks, originally had something much bigger in mind. According to Mohammad’s 2008…

9/11 What-if Scenarios

By Patrick J. Kiger Unfortunately, there’s no way to undo the tragedy of the September 11 attacks. But just as we wonder how history might have been different had Abraham Lincoln chosen not to go to Ford’s Theater on that fateful night in 1865, or what might have happened had U.S. Naval Intelligence gotten wind…

9/11 and Global Consciousness

Chances are, you probably remember exactly what you were doing on the morning of September 11, 2001, at the moment when you first learned about the attack on the World Trade Center. And if you were one of the millions who stared in horror at the television images of smoke billowing from the crippled towers, you undoubtedly can recall the intense, excruciatingly painful surge of grief and anger and sadness that you felt.

National Geographic Bees Make D.C. a Little Sweeter

The National Geographic Society picked up several hundred new employees this past week. They will work 24 hours a day, rain or shine, and will live on our rooftop. In turn, they will produce one of the most amazing substances known in the universe–it is honey; they are bees.