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Geography in the News: Losing Daylight Savings Time

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM No Longer Saving Time? Daylight saving time will be over for this year in most of the United States at 2 a.m. on November 2. With the exceptions of American Samoa, Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, the rest of the country…

Geography in the News: Worldwide Wheat Production

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM The Role of Wheat in Worldwide Agriculture Wheat is the principal grain used to make most breads and pastries. Grown mostly in the middle latitudes and Northern Hemisphere, annual wheat harvests are watched carefully. As the “staff of life” to multitudes, annual harvest assessments…

A Retrofuturistic Train Journey to Explore America’s New Frontiers

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Tomorrow, a group of 25 millennial pioneers will embark on a retrofuturistic, crowdfunded train journey across America known as the Millennial Trains Project. Along the way, they will meet with local innovators, grow as leaders, and build trans-regional perspectives relating to their personal, professional, and creative interests. Instead of buying souvenirs, they will use 3D…

June 15, 2014: Negotiating Elephant Truce With Armies, Running 50 Marathons in 50 Days and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. This week, we negotiate a truce between armies and Central African forest elephants, find common ground between jazz and physics, learn to take a cover photo for National Geographic magazine, run 50 marathons in 50 states in 50 straight days, learn the National Parks Service’s most secret places, and learn about panda bear’s reproductive difficulties.

Geography in the News: Geographic Calibrations

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Comprehending Distance and Area Occasionally we need to be reminded that the concepts of distance and area are important to the day-to-day understanding of breaking news stories, as well as many of our daily personal decisions. Although modern communications and transportation have reduced the…

Stanford: There’s No Money in Dead Bears

April 1st saw the opening of another trophy hunt season in British Columbia, a sport in which armed hunters stalk bears, moose and other selective wild game animals, killing them and retaining their paws and heads as memorial. Long considered morally unsound by scientists and conservationists, researchers are again questioning controversial industry claims that trophy…

March 24, 2014: Big Wave Crashes, Haitian Folk-Tunes, Babysitting Gorillas and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are held underwater until they blackout and are rescued, put Langston Hughes’ poetry to music, study bats in the living room, grow up with gorillas, survive a deadly Antarctic expedition, remind travelers to represent their nations, refuse to order bluefin tuna sushi, and create stronger laws to protect elephants.

The U.S. and Mexico Partner to Save the Colorado River Delta

Since 1960, the Colorado River has not flowed regularly to the sea. While pockets of green remain, the Colorado in its delta is a parched river begging for relief. The dry, sandy channel glares in the bright sun, abandoned by the river that has been overtapped and overworked for too long. It’s hard not to think of the…

Spadefoot Toad and Other Weird State Symbols

Louisiana’s official crustacean? Crayfish. New Mexico’s honored amphibian? The spadefoot toad. See what other states have quirky symbols to show their pride.

November 17, 2013: Horse-Riding Across Asia, Roadtripping America With a Canine Copilot and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson, as we ride 6,000 miles across Central Asia, collect chicken feces to protect bees from wasps, cycle across Iceland, ponder the moose’s plight, and drive to every state with a canine copilot.

September 1, 2013: Speed Hiking From Mexico to Canada, Coming Face to Face With a Grizzly and More

This week, we set a speed record walking from Mexico to Canada, pack bear spray in the event that we encounter a bear, dog or family member who gets out of line, and cycle across the United States in just 42 days.

The Most Incredible Oklahoma Tornado Videos

See some of the most compelling clips of the Oklahoma tornado, as chosen by National Geographic’s video editors.

Hawaii Named Happiest State in New Poll

Life getting you down? Maybe it’s time to go to Hawaii. According to the results of a recent poll by Gallup, Hawaii’s residents are the happiest people in the United States.

The Bottom Line: Historic Anniversary for Fishing in America’s Oceans

It’s hard to get politicians to agree on anything these days. But five years ago this month, President George W. Bush, flanked by Republican and Democratic members of Congress, signed the reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA). This moment of bipartisanship was good news for our nation’s marine species and those…

Mapping Our Nation’s Ascendancy

This year marks the beginning of the Civil War’s Sesquicentennial. Just six months after commemorations began, sales of National Geographic’s Battles of the Civil War map have increased exponentially. It appears this key period of our nation’s history remains in the hearts and minds of many of our citizens. I was well reminded of this…