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One Way China is Getting Serious About Climate Change

China, the world’s top emitter of greenhouse gasses, has a plan to use climate change to is economic advantage. It’s plan is very, well, American.

Durban Plan for Climate Treaty Greeted With Mixed Feelings

The COP17 round of climate negotiations in Durban has once again shown just how hard it is to devise a cohesive international response to this threatening phenomenon. It is for this reason that the conference’s agreement to sign up to an all-inclusive legal commitment to reduce carbon emissions has been hailed as a major breakthrough,…

Factory Farming Is Not the Best We Have to Offer

Our food system is in desperate need of reform; people, animals and the Earth are suffering, says Gene Baur, an advocate for raising awareness about the negative consequences of industrialized factory farming . “Thankfully, we are beginning to pay attention. Many citizens are demanding more transparency around how food, and especially animal products, are produced. We are no longer comfortable accepting how agribusiness keeps animals who are raised for food hidden from us,” he says in this guest post.

U.S. Adds 26,000 Acres to Petrified Forest Park

America’s best idea just got better, with the announcement today of an addition of some 40 square miles of fossil-rich lands to the U.S. Petrified Forest National Park (PFNP).

What the California Shark Fin Ban Means

California Assemblymen Paul Fong (D-Mountain View) and Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael), with the support of conservation organizations, introduced Assembly Bill 376, which bans the possession, sale or trade of shark fins. “It’s a great day for sharks in California,” said Michael Sutton, vice president for Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Center for the Future of the Oceans, a co-sponsor of the legislation.

The Original Plans for 9/11

By Patrick J. Kiger As horrifyingly deadly and destructive as the September 11 attacks on New York and Washington were, it’s perhaps even more chilling to realize that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the Kuwaiti Al Qaeda operative who has been indicted for planning the attacks, originally had something much bigger in mind. According to Mohammad’s 2008…

9/11 What-if Scenarios

By Patrick J. Kiger Unfortunately, there’s no way to undo the tragedy of the September 11 attacks. But just as we wonder how history might have been different had Abraham Lincoln chosen not to go to Ford’s Theater on that fateful night in 1865, or what might have happened had U.S. Naval Intelligence gotten wind…

9/11 and Global Consciousness

Chances are, you probably remember exactly what you were doing on the morning of September 11, 2001, at the moment when you first learned about the attack on the World Trade Center. And if you were one of the millions who stared in horror at the television images of smoke billowing from the crippled towers, you undoubtedly can recall the intense, excruciatingly painful surge of grief and anger and sadness that you felt.

Pacific Islanders Use Stars to Sail Canoes From New Zealand to California

  Pacific sailors concerned about the great ocean’s future recently charted a course towards future healing by reaching back to the incredible voyages of their ancestors. Sailors on the Pacific Voyagers project steered a fleet of traditional Polynesian sailing canoes or vaka from New Zealand to San Francisco—guided only by the stars that once helped…

Hurricane Video for National Geographic Television

The National Geographic Channel is looking for footage documenting your Hurricane Irene survival stories. Our television team is working diligently over the next several days to create a documentary covering this historic storm, and we want your experience to be a part of it.

Overfishing 101: Why Ending Overfishing is Good for Fish and Fishermen Alike

NOTE: This is a guest post from Lee Crockett, Director of Federal Fisheries Policy at the Pew Environment Group This post is the sixth in a series, “Overfishing 101.” The entire series can be viewed here. As a lifelong angler, I’m the first to admit that fishing can inspire passionate arguments about where, when and how to fish.…

Overfishing 101: Why Ending Overfishing Pays Off in the Long Run

NOTE: This is a guest post from Lee Crockett, Director of Federal Fisheries Policy at the Pew Environment Group This post is the fifth in a series, “Overfishing 101.” The entire series can be viewed here. America’s ocean fish are an incredibly valuable resource. According to the most recent economic data from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS),…

Overfishing 101: The Importance of Rebuilding Our Fish Populations Without Delay

Note: This is the fourth post in a series, “Overfishing 101.” Read the previous posts here. Overfishing—taking fish from our oceans faster than they can reproduce—has plagued fisheries for decades. South Atlantic red snapper, for example, have been subject to overfishing since the 1960s. Congress first attempted to deal with this problem in 1976 when it passed…

Overfishing 101: How U.S. Ocean Fish Populations Are Managed – Part II

Note: This is the third post in a series, “Overfishing 101.” Read the previous posts here. My interest in the ocean began when I joined the Coast Guard at age 18. This was the start of a passion that led me to study marine science, work at the National Marine Fisheries Service and help promote…

Overfishing 101: How Ocean Fish Populations are Managed in the U.S.

In the second post of a special series to mark the 35th anniversary of the U.S. Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, a law that is helping to rebuild America’s depleted ocean fish populations and ensure their long-term sustainability, Lee Crockett looks at some of the basics of why all Americans should care about how our fish are managed.