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February 23, 2014: Cycling to the South Pole, Saving India’s Killer Tigers and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they endure a 750-mile bike ride from Antarctica’s coast to the South Pole, explore the sonic wonders of the world, explain the Yukon’s modern-day gold rush, fly south for the winter with snowy owls, empower Bolivia’s rural citizens to protect their corner of the world, kayak the length of the Colorado and Green Rivers, recover from unpleasant tropical parasites, advocate for tigers and humans when species clash in India, track Turkey’s bears by cellphone.

December 1, 2013: Running the Amazon from New Source to Sea, Fact Checking Thanksgiving and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio show, join host Boyd Matson, as he and his guests paddle the length of the Amazon River, see Jerusalem through the eyes of its citizens, debunk Thanksgiving’s creation myths, and taking selfies with tigers.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #55

Show-stopping peafowl, pygmy-tyrants, babblers, flowerpeckers and sapphires are the pick of the wild bird photographs from this week! Go to the new Wild Bird Trust website to learn more about our research and conservation projects in Africa. Please consider making a contribution to the Wild Bird Trust to help us stimulate positive change for wild birds in…

October 20, 2013: Paddling and Kite Surfing East Africa, Reenacting Civil War Battles and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we paddle board and kite surf in East Africa before meeting disaster, reenact the Civil War’s second bloodiest battle, motorcycle through the Middle East while searching for enlightenment, and combine rock & roll with genetics while trying to save humanity from infectious disease.

What Will Happen to Turkish Villagers in the Path of a Giant Dam?

The final dispatch from NG Young Explorer Julia Harte and team member Anna Ozbek examines the lives of villagers who have already been displaced by hydroelectric dams in Southeastern Turkey — and what they portend for residents of the 12,000-year-old town of Hasankeyf, soon to be submerged by the Ilısu Dam.

Rare Footage of Ilısu: The Dam That Will Flood Homes and History Across Southern Turkey

NG Young Explorer Julia Harte and team member Anna Ozbek visit the construction site of the Ilısu Dam, a 1,200 MW hydroelectric dam whose reservoir will displace at least 25,000 people and flood hundreds of archeological sites across Southeastern Turkey.

Turkish Town Has Hosted 12,000 Years of Human History & Stunning Biodiversity

Almost nowhere in the world is human history as densely layered as it is in Hasankeyf. Strange sights greet its visitors: thousands of caves carved into limestone cliffs, children playing on the remains of a gargantuan medieval bridge, the towering minaret of a 15th-century mosque. Explore the ancient Turkish town with NG Young Explorer Julia Harte and team member Anna Ozbek.

July 14, 2013: Leaving Your Spouse In the Death Zone, Brokering a Human-Tiger Peace, and More

This week, we summit all of 14 of the world’s 8,000 metre peaks with the first woman to do so, then we try to reduce human-animal conflict across India, and finally, we meet some of the world’s ugliest critters.

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM THE GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISIONS OF EUROPE AND ASIA Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing.   Most students of history,…

Will Shrinking Rivers Force Kurdistan’s Nomads to Abandon Their Lifestyle?

Kurdish and Arabic nomads, a dwindling population in Iraqi Kurdistan, may be forced to move to cities if river levels in the region continue to decline. NG Young Explorer Julia Harte and team member Anna Ozbek report on the situation through text, photos, and video.

Two Views of the Tigris: A Syrian and an Iraqi Kurd Discuss Turkey’s Dams

Near the point where Turkey, Iraq, and Syria meet, two villages face each other across the Tigris River. On one side lies the Iraqi Kurdish village of Faysh Khabur, home to a Chaldean Christian community for more than fourteen centuries. On the other bank sits Khanik Village, another ancient Chaldean community — but one that lies in Syria.

Is Every Civilization Destined to Collapse?

What does it mean for a civilization to collapse? Are we destined to follow suit? Archaeologists working around the world conclude a week-long conference with their perspectives.

Why Did Ancient Civilizations Build Such Huge Monuments?

Why did ancient civilizations begin with the building of such huge monuments? Archaeologists working around the world share their reflections.

What Is “Civilization”?

After days of presentations on five of the world’s great ancient civilizations, archaeologists from sites all around the world debate and discuss the meaning of civilization and what we can learn today from the lessons of the past.

December 23, 2012: Whispering Dogs’ Secrets, Saving Cheetahs with Donkeys, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we whisper dogs’ secrets to their owners, trade guns for climbing gear in Rio, paint endangered animals onto a barn, teach donkeys to protect cows from cheetahs in Namibia, save the world from a Mayan apocalypse, tunnel deep under Gaza to deliver groceries, sacrifice our fingertips to bee stings in Turkey, and take in hot air from shale rock across the United States.