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Geography in the News: The Timeless Titanic Story

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM A New Titanic is Coming April 15th 2012 marked the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the luxury passenger ship Titanic. A memorial Titanic cruise left Southampton, England, on April 8, 2012 to visit the site of the sinking. The cruise was sold out,…

Top 10 “Nat Geo Talks” Videos for 2012

Live presentations have been a part of National Geographic since the 1800s, and today more than 140 are viewable online. See this year’s best.

What Happened To The Titanic Survivors? One Of Them Wrote For National Geographic Magazine

Helen Churchill Candee’s 1936 National Geographic article “Summering in an English Cottage” may not sound like the stuff of adventure, but its writer knew plenty about excitement. Journalist, Washington socialite, suffragette, globe-trotter, White House interior decorator — those were just a few of Candee’s accomplishments. And then there was that last-minute trip she booked on the RMS Titanic…

Robert Ballard: Titanic’s Titan

Bob Ballard will forever go down in history as the one who discovered the Titanic. But to Bob, finding the Titanic was more than just a scientific challenge. It was a humbling experience that left him with a deep connection and quiet respect for a ship and all its passengers.

It’s Like Coming Home, Says James Cameron

James Cameron tells Boyd Matson how making Hollywood blockbusters allows him follow his true passion of exploring and how becoming a NG Explorer feels like coming home. Listen to the interview.

Why Particle Physicists Need to Be Humble

Grand unified theory. Re-creating the big bang. Finding the “God particle.” Some days it seems as if particle physicists are on the verge of discovering the ultimate answer to life, the universe, and everything. Which may or may not be 42. With the recent stream of breakthroughs in dark matter, neutrinos, and the debut of…

Ballard’s High-Tech Look on Ocean Worlds

Several of the Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) Robert Ballard uses to probe the deep were on display Monday at the ribbon-cutting for his new Inner Space Center. They’re an essential part of Ballard’s “telepresence” exploration scenario, which I described in an earlier post. The most rugged of the submersibles can descend more than 19,000 feet…