National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for Tanzania

“You’re It!”: Alpha Male Seeks Out Hidden Chimp

With the scarcity of ripe fruit at Gombe over the last month and a half, the chimps have spread out across the park in order to avoid intense feeding competition. While, currently, this might be the best foraging strategy, it can be awfully lonely.

China Ivory Prosecution: A Success Exposes Fundamental Failure

Chinese media reported last week that China has convicted a major ivory seller in Fujian and his accomplices for their role in an international ivory trafficking scheme that smuggled nearly eight tonnes of ivory out of Kenya, Tanzania, and Nigeria. The arrest and conviction of a government-accredited ivory trader by Chinese authorities is a major…

Hunger Games: One Chimp’s Thrilling Monkey Hunt

With foraging chimps coming up with little more than a few hard, bright green fruits, it wasn’t surprising when one tried his odds at catching a more satisfying meal.

March 17, 2013: Getting Married at the North Pole, Cage-Free Swimming With Great Whites and More

On this week’s show, meet a woman who free-dives with great white sharks, a man who skied to the North Pole in the darkness of winter, and photographers who can turn such darkness into a colorful portrait of a world we can’t see.

Chimps Chow Down on Spring Bouquets

Coinciding with celebrations of Spring taking place in the Northern Hemisphere, the return of the rains to Gombe National Park has brought a spray of a different kind to brighten up the gloom.

February 16, 2013: Winter Mountain Climbing, Great Ape Stakeouts and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, we attempt a winter ascent of Denali for a third time, live with Idaho’s wolves for six years, and wait for months, just to capture a perfect moment in Indonesia’s jungle canopy.

Dislocation: My Transition Back to Gombe National Park

In which I return to Gombe National Park to observe the behavior of wild chimpanzees. Luckily, I had a chance to pack this time or I really would be living with the apes.

February 3, 2013: Paddle Boarding Down Waterfalls, Searching for Venomous Snakes, and More

Join National Geographic Weekend radio show this week, as we kayak off waterfalls, refuse to run from charging lions, and treat disease with venom from some of the most poisonous snakes around.

Closer Look: Tanzanian Community Rallies to End Illegal Lion Killings

Day 4 of Big Cat Week Closer Looks, we’re talking to a biologist who ignited a movement to end unjust lion killings in Tanzania.

Closer Look: Making Friends with Technology

Conservationist Amy Dickman knew she couldn’t help big cats in Tanzania rebound without the involvement and support of the local people. Initially communication with the rural community was strained, until they realized she had something they wanted: an outlet to charge their cellphones. Watch this week’s 3rd installment of the Big Cat Week Closer Look series!

Lion Numbers Plunge as African Wilderness Succumbs to Human Pressure

The king of the African savannah is in serious trouble because people are taking over the continent’s last patches of wilderness on unprecedented scale, according to a detailed study released this week. The most comprehensive assessment of lion (Panthera leo) numbers to date determined that Africa’s once-thriving savannahs are undergoing massive land-use conversion and burgeoning human population growth. The decline has had a significant impact on the lions that make their home in these savannahs; their numbers have dropped to as low as 32,000, down from hundreds of thousands estimated just 50 years ago.

Maasai Women Speak Out for Living Walls

The Big Cats Initiative Grants Program seeks to identify and support projects that engage in immediate actions leading to reductions in big cat mortality. Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld, Executive Director of the African People and Wildlife Fund, has been the recipient of multiple BCI grants and provides a prime example of how the BCI and its…

New Global Land Rush Trampling Human Rights

It is an age-old story in the developing world, one that rarely ends happily ever after.  Communities without economic power that live off of land to which they do not “own” are devastated when their government transfers the property rights to wealthy outside interests, who exploit the natural resources. These land deals often result in…

National Geographic Assignment of a Lifetime

National Geographic photographer Nick Nichols is working on a new project in Africa, photographing Serengeti lions. But this assignment is something new, even for a magazine known for pushing the boundaries of photography. Backed up by a team of National Geographic experts, Nichols is deploying a remotely operated miniature helicopter to dangle a camera above a pride of predator, and a toy car to drive a camera within a paw swat of the big cats. The results he hopes for: pictures of Africa’s wild lions such as no one has ever seen.

From smart phones to smart farming: Indigenous knowledge sharing in Tanzania

Many people believe communications technology helps the developing world by allowing people to link up with the ‘West’ and be given information and knowledge. It is often people in the developing world with the knowledge, and what technology can instead do is help them unlock that knowledge and share it with one another. Eugenio Tisselli…