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March 30, 2014: Skiing Everest, Search for Michael Rockefeller, Violent Animal Reproduction, and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests try to solve the mystery of the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller, figure out if Mother Nature is really trying to kill you, ski off the seven summits including Everest, look inside the city of Damascus during the Syrian War, dive into Mission Blue with Sylvia Earle, look at how much food we waste each year, take a walk on the surface of Mars, and find out what we should pack on a camping trip.

Twitter Chat With Anne Barnard

New York Times Beirut bureau chief Anne Barnard covers the Middle East and has witnessed firsthand the changes that are taking place in Damascus, a city that has been affected by the chaos of war. And we’re giving you the chance to ask her questions about her experience. In her feature “Syria: The Chaos of War”…

October 20, 2013: Paddling and Kite Surfing East Africa, Reenacting Civil War Battles and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we paddle board and kite surf in East Africa before meeting disaster, reenact the Civil War’s second bloodiest battle, motorcycle through the Middle East while searching for enlightenment, and combine rock & roll with genetics while trying to save humanity from infectious disease.

Despite Dominance of Syria Debate, Environmental Policies Make Headway

Disagreements over the Syrian chemical weapons crisis didn’t stop leaders from reaching a consensus to phase down production and consumption of refrigerant greenhouse gases and phase out inefficient fossil fuel subsidies at the G-20 Summit in Russia. The world’s top greenhouse gas emitters—the U.S. and China—agreed to set up a contact group to explore specific issues related to…

September 8, 2013: Paddling Through Russia’s Remotest Rivers, Playing Matchmaker for Rhinos, and More

Join us this week, as we paddle 3,000 miles through the remotest rivers in Mongolia and Russia, try to help in Syria’s civil war by starting a children’s camp for refugees, create a dating game for rhinos, film Africa’s disappearing megafauna, and ride hogs across the United States.

A Place of Peace: Summer Camp for Syrian Refugee Children

Last week Emerging Explorer Aziz Abu Sarah opened a summer camp for hundreds of Syrian children refugees on the Syrian-Turkish border. For these kids, even a safe place to play is going a long way.

Two Views of the Tigris: A Syrian and an Iraqi Kurd Discuss Turkey’s Dams

Near the point where Turkey, Iraq, and Syria meet, two villages face each other across the Tigris River. On one side lies the Iraqi Kurdish village of Faysh Khabur, home to a Chaldean Christian community for more than fourteen centuries. On the other bank sits Khanik Village, another ancient Chaldean community — but one that lies in Syria.

Top 10 Headlines Today: New Dino Found, Lost Continent Discovered…

The top 10 news stories on our radar today: A new dome-skulled dinosaur has been found in Canada, scientists have discovered what’s been dubbed a potential “Brazilian Atlantis,” and…

Is Every Civilization Destined to Collapse?

What does it mean for a civilization to collapse? Are we destined to follow suit? Archaeologists working around the world conclude a week-long conference with their perspectives.

Why Did Ancient Civilizations Build Such Huge Monuments?

Why did ancient civilizations begin with the building of such huge monuments? Archaeologists working around the world share their reflections.

What Is “Civilization”?

After days of presentations on five of the world’s great ancient civilizations, archaeologists from sites all around the world debate and discuss the meaning of civilization and what we can learn today from the lessons of the past.

Lessons in Sustainability and Solidarity From Ancient Mesopotamia

World leaders in archaeology discuss the ancient development of Mesopotamian society and the very practical lessons and inspiration it holds for us today.

Geography in the News: Golan Heights

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com GOLAN HEIGHTS AND THE DMZ In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since…

Ancient “Desert Kites” Funneled Gazelles into Killing Pits, Study Finds

As long as 6,000 years ago the people of the Middle East were using a system of stone structures to funnel thousands of migrating gazelles and other animals into traps where they could be killed and butchered, a new study has determined. “Humans may have driven a species of gazelle to the brink of extinction…

New Hope for a Rare Bird in the Syrian Desert, Explorers Journal

A few years back, Gianluca Serra found a legendary bird thought extinct in Syria, with funds from National Geographic’s Committee for Research and Exploration. Now Serra is trying to forge a stable population of these ungainly creatures, with a little help from a prince and some first ladies. By Barbara Moffet Q: The northern bald…