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Interview With Seafood Watch Celebrity Chef Doug Katz

Dr. Jordan Schaul interviews Seafood Watch’s Celebrity Chef Doug Katz about the famed sustainable seafood program developed by the Monterey Bay Aquarium. The Monterey Bay Aquarium (MBAQ) launched the renowned Seafood Watch program several years ago with the initial intent to help keep marine fisheries robust and healthy. The Aquarium reached out to seafood aficionados…

Can Behavioral Economics Help Save Coral Reefs and Fisheries?

It’s not that people don’t care about the environment; it’s that more pressing needs like feeding their families and paying their bills trump environmental concerns. As a marine biologist, I worry about how poverty can hinder the sustainability of fishing, and therefore endanger the future of fishing communities. The “teach a man to fish” adage can only hold…

September 29, 2013: Photographing Every Animal in Captivity, Saving Apes from Guerillas, and More

Join us this week, as we set a world record kayaking 151 miles in 24 hours, then build an Ark to help save all of the world’s animals, teach pandas to breed successfully, and finally, rekindle old friendships with indigenous people in Nepal after 45 years apart.

Australian Research Consortium Engages on Critical Minerals

Article by Gillian Cornish, Artem Golev and Saleem Ali This article provides a summary of the Rare Earths Research Symposium which was held at The University of Queensland (UQ) in Brisbane, Australia on Friday 31 May, 2013 with more than 70 attendees from industry, academia and government to discuss emerging research questions surrounding the full…

It’s Not All Bad: Americans and Palm Oil

Climate change and its impact on Americans Your family carefully sorts your trash and composts table scraps weekly and tries really hard to remember to bring cloth or canvas bags to the grocery store. Some of us drive hybrid cars and support wind power, while others ride a bike to work because they want to…

Geography in the News: Ethiopia’s Dam Projects

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM ETHIOPIA’S CAPTURE OF THE BLUE NILE In addition to Egypt’s latest political turmoil, its government is extremely worried about Ethiopia’s newest dam on the headwaters of the Blue Nile. The Blue Nile is the leading source of water for the north-flowing Nile. Fears in…

The Struggle for Sustainability on Africa’s Little Green Jewel

In Madagascar, environmentalism can often take a back seat to practicality and even survival.

iLCP Photo Expedition to Document Cradle of Marine Biodiversity

“Long term and meaningful conservation success really is only possible if NGOs and photographers work together – very often also working with scientists. If you can get those three sectors working together, you’re pretty much a non-stoppable force.” Thomas Peschak, Conservation Photographer and iLCP Fellow The International League of Conservation Photographers has pulled together an…

The Bottom Line: Food Fit For a King

The annual arrival of spring chinook salmon to inland rivers makes March an eagerly anticipated time of year for fishermen and seafood lovers on the Pacific Coast. Anglers wait all year for the chance to land a hulking silvery chinook, commonly known as a king salmon, and consumers enjoy eating this tasty fish. When it…

Talking Poop With Author of “The Origin of Feces”

In his new book, The Origin of Feces, David Waltner Toews does the dirty work of showing that poop is part of our daily lives—from food to health to sustainability.

Weaker Kyoto Protocol Extended at International Climate Negotiations

After weeks of deliberation among representatives of nearly 200 countries, the United Nations climate talks ended with an agreement to extend the life of the Kyoto Protocol. The only global agreement in place to curb greenhouse gas emissions from industrialized nations, it was set to expire at the end of this year. The second phase of the Kyoto Protocol still leaves…

Pulsating Heart of Nature: How to Ensure Our Collective Bioculturally Resilient Future

  The remarkable variety of life’s interdependent phenomena and processes — what we call ‘diversity’ — is being eroded by the modern forces of homogenization. The rich tapestry — woven from a countless multitude of mutually reinforcing strands of biological, cultural and linguistic relationships — is wearing out. Our increasingly fatigued world is losing its…

Martha’s Legacy: The Past, Present, and Future of Species, Ecosystems, and Human Livelihoods

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development. Many of us saw this as a turning point, a time when the world adopted a new paradigm for development. We have come to realize that economic growth and social justice cannot be achieved at the expense of the environment.

Sustainable Cities “Can Improve Lives and Build a Healthier Planet”

It may seem counterintuitive in a world where giant urban concentrations of billions of people are snagged in traffic congestion and endless sprawl, but cities may well be the smartest way to both make our use of the planet sustainable and raise prosperity.

Rescaling Civilization: TNC Chief Scientist Peter Kareiva

The following is a guest post from Matt Miller, a writer for The Nature Conservancy. It originally appeared on Cool Green Science. This week, the journal Nature published a paper by Conservancy lead scientist Peter Kareiva, Paul Ehrlich, and Gretchen Daily titled Securing Natural Capital and Expanding Equity to Rescale Civilization. In it, the authors…