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Tag archives for Sri Lanka

New to Nat Geo: Ask Your Weird Animal Questions

In our inaugural column of Ask Your Weird Animal Questions, we tell you how a new species of tapir hid in plain sight and investigate a sighting of a two-horned lizard.

Rare Horned Lizards of Sri Lanka Revealed

The little-studied reptiles may use their strange horns to communicate with mates or rivals, new research suggests.

Geography in the News: A New International Canal?

Guest Authors: Malavika Nidhi and Rahul Nagvekar, students of Mrs. Rita McMahon, Dulles High School, Sugar Land, Texas.* This invited Geography in the News article initially was posted on Maps.com’s website and was made part of its 900-article GITN archive. Permission to post here is granted by Maps.com and Neal G. Lineback and Mandy Lineback…

China’s Wolong Nature Reserve has Giant Pandas, but India’s Chambal Wildlife Sanctuary has Gharials & Gangetic Dolphins

As humans continue to encroach on waterways and wild lands and develop them to the extent they can, some species may vanish with or without our attempts to conserve them. With that said, we continue to fail at keeping illegal poachers at bay;  we continue to reproduce exponentially; we fail to reduce our carbon footprint;…

Rescued Bear Tales of Two of Hollywood’s Most Acclaimed Sibling Actors — Eric & Julia Roberts

National Geographic science contributor Dr. Jordan Schaul shares some famous bear tales regarding the international travel of two of Hollywood’s most acclaimed sibling actors. Occasionally, I interview people in the entertainment industry (link).  Among them are famed Hollywood stars making quite a positive impact on animal welfare and wildlife conservation. This includes addressing concerns that…

Big Discovery and Big Challenges for the World’s Biggest Animal

At the 2013 TED Fellows presentations, Asha de Vos describes a unique group of blue whales, who live their entire lives in the warm waters of the Indian Ocean.

Love potions threaten survival of lorises

Lorises–small, nocturnal primates found throughout Asia–are threatened by wildlife trade at levels that may be detrimental to their survival, according to researchers from Malaysia, Australia and the UK. A study, recently published in the American Journal of Primatology, examined the trade in slow and slender lorises in Sri Lanka, Cambodia and Indonesia and found clear…

Food Shortages Loom in Asia Without irrigation Reform

This post is part of a special National Geographic news series on global water issues. Without major reforms and innovations in the way water is used for agriculture, many developing nations in Asia face the politically risky prospect of having to import more than a quarter of the rice, wheat and maize they will need…