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Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: The Largest Spider in the World

Weird Animal Questions got a new kind of query this week when a reader sent us a photo of a peculiar creature and asked for help identifying it. It turned out to be so much fun to answer that we’re starting a “What’s in Your Yard?” feature: Send Weird Animal Questions your pictures of unidentified…

Dwarf Spiders’ “Chastity Belts” Explained

Scientists have revealed new discoveries about mating plugs, which dwarf male spiders insert into females to keep out rival sperm.

Can Spider Venom Save the Honeybee?

A new pesticide based on the venom of a particular spider kills common agricultural pests but leaves honeybees unharmed, a new study says.

Spider Disguises Itself as Bird Droppings

The spider Cyclosa ginnaga hides from predators by looking like a pile of bird feces, a new study says.

Cartwheeling Spider Found, Inspires New Robot

Dubbed a “biological wonder,” a new species of spider discovered in Morocco flips its way out of danger, a new study says.

Hostile Female Spiders Eat Males Before Mating

Female burrowing wolf spiders with violent tendencies are more likely to snack on their mates before mating, a new study says.

Ancient Daddy Longlegs Had Extra Set of Eyes

The 305-million-year-old fossil may reveal secrets about the evolution of spider eyes, new study says.

Surprising Animals That Sport Mustaches

Jumping spiders, emperor tamarins, and walruses are among nature’s creatures that sport staches.

Your Weird Animal Questions Answered

What is a honey badger, really? How do spiders not get stuck to their webs? See answers to these questions and more in our weekly Q&A column.

Your Shot Pictures: More Albino and Oddly White Animals

See an albino bat, wallaby, deer, and more in our roundup of photos submitted by National Geographic readers.

How Do Spiders Walk Upside Down? Mystery Solved

Tiny, flexible hairs at the end of spiders’ legs are the secret to their sticky success, a new study says.

“Slingshot Spider” Flings Sticky Web at Prey, Spider-Man Style

In a Spider-Man-like move, a possibly new species of spider uses its web as a slingshot to ensnare prey.

Male Black Widow Spiders “Twerk” to Avoid Being Eaten by Females

Male black widow spiders shake their booties to send friendly messages to females—and avoid getting eaten, a new study says.

Your Best Names for the Mystery Picket-Fence Spider

Carousel spider, American dream spider, Druid spider—see the creative names suggested for the new Amazonian arachnid that makes “picket fences.”

Mystery Picket Fence in Amazon Explained

The animal that built strange web-like structures in the Amazon has finally been identified, scientists say.