National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for Spencer Wells

Happy DNA Day: Genetic Results From New York City Students Reveal Microcosm of the World

Sixty-one years ago tomorrow, James Watson and Francis Crick published a landmark paper on the structure of DNA. Now, April 25 is recognized as DNA Day, a day for celebrating all that we know about genetics, including what DNA tells us about our ancient past. Today, Genographic Project scientists are collaborating with populations around the…

Testing the Genetic Diversity of College Students in New York City

Two-hundred university students trudged through the snowy New York City streets to swab their cheeks and trace their ancient ancestry with the Genographic Project on Monday evening at the American Museum of Natural History. Students from over eight local Universities were given the unique opportunity to test their DNA with the Geno 2.0 DNA Ancestry…

The Genographic Project Returns to Ireland to Reveal DNA Results

Hundreds of County Mayo, Ireland residents gathered earlier this week to learn first hand what their DNA could show them about their ancient past. From Viking ancestry to descending from Niall of the Nine Hostages, the genetics of County Mayo proved intriguing, reaching far beyond Guinness and the rolling green landscape.

DNA Research Reveals Uros People of Peru and Bolivia to Have Distinctive Genetic Ancestries

New genetic research led by the Genographic Project team shows a distinctive ancestry for the Uros populations of Peru and Bolivia that predates the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores and may date back to the earliest settlement of the Altiplano of the central Andes some 3,700 years ago.

What’s in Your Genes? Join a Twitter Chat with Geneticist Spencer Wells

When National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Robert Ballard, best known for his discovery of the R.M.S. Titanic, first participated in the Genographic Project, he expected to confirm what he already knew of his British-Dutch ancestry. But could his DNA tell him more about his ancient relatives? Dr. Ballard decided to “swab” with National Geographic’s Genographic Project to…

January 13, 2013: Bonding With Elephants, Unlocking Our Genealogy, and More

This week, we head to the remote jungles of Ecuador, inhale living microbes with every breath we take, document a dying tradition of working with elephants in India, and learn about an unlikely set of friends in Ethiopia.

Afghans Share Unique Genetic Heritage, DNA Study By The Genographic Project

Through DNA analysis, The Genographic Project has discovered that the majority of all known ethnic Afghans share a unique genetic heritage derived from a single common ancestral population dating back as many as 10,000 years ago.

International Teachers Go Genographic

This week Genographic Project team members, including Project Director and NG Explorer-in-Residence Spencer Wells, are working with teachers at the European Council for International Schools Conference in Lisbon, Portugal to integrate the project’s educational initiative, GenoThreads into their classrooms. Learn more about the available lesson plans.

Modern Humans Wandered Out of Africa via Arabia

Evolutionary history shows that human populations likely originated in Africa, and the Genographic Project, the most extensive survey of human population genetic data to date, suggests where they went next: Arabia.

Google Science Fair Winners Announced

Last night at Google headquarters, some of the world’s smartest people gathered and most of them aren’t even old enough to drive.

Google Science Fair Finalists Named

Over the past two weeks, the judges of the 2011 Google Science Fair have been whittling down the list of 60 semifinalists to just 15 who will advance to compete for the ultimate prizes. All of the students’ entries “asked interesting questions, many focused on real-world problems and some produced groundbreaking science that challenged current…

Google Unveils Global Science Fair With National Geographic

National Geographic has joined Google, CERN, the LEGO Group, and Scientific American to launch a global online science competition for students ages 13 to 18: The Google Science Fair. By Ford Cochran The next generation’s Albert Einsteins and Marie Curies got a chance to jumpstart their careers this morning with the debut of the Google…

Asian Invaders Showed Europeans how to Farm, Graveyard Study Finds

International researchers led by ancient DNA experts from the University of Adelaide, Australia, said today that they had settled the longstanding issue of the origins of the people who introduced farming to Europe some 8,000 years ago. DNA carefully extracted from a complete graveyard of Early Neolithic farmers unearthed at the town of Derenburg in…

Planting the Seeds of Human Destiny

Renowned geneticist and anthropologist Spencer Wells has traced human evolution back to our earliest ancestors. He directs the Genographic Project, which is collecting and analyzing hundreds of thousands of DNA samples from people around the world in order to decipher how our ancestors populated the planet. Now, in his  new book, he examines our cultural inheritance in…

Genographic Test Reveals Darwin’s Ancestry

A Genographic cheek swab test on Chris Darwin—great-great-grandson of Charles Darwin, author of On the Origin of Species—has revealed the deep ancestry of the so-called “Father of Evolution.” National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Spencer Wells revealed the test results today in Sydney, Australia, at the annual meeting of scientists leading Genographic Project field investigations around the world.…