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Dead and Lost Boobies: Harbingers of a Growing El Niño?

Starving seabirds far from home may point to a brewing El Nino in the Pacific.

Shark Species Thought to Be Extinct Turns Up in Fish Market

When scouting for extremely rare species probably the last place you’d think to check would be “the store.” And yet it was at a store of sorts–a public fish market in Kuwait to be exact–where marine researchers rediscovered the smoothtooth blacktip shark (Carcharhinus leiodon) in 2008. The species was thought to be extinct, or not even a…

3-Foot-Long Earthworms Get a Boost in Australia

The dwindling giant Gippsland earthworm is getting a new lease on life as part of an innovative farming program in Australia.

Photos: Orange Octopus, More Creatures Found Deep in Antarctic Sea

A bristle-cage worm, a sea lily, and an orange octopus are among species hauled up from Antarctica’s Amundsen Sea for the first time.

Five Surprising New Bat Species Found in Africa

Tiny mammals split off from other species three million years ago, study says.

Troll-Haired Mystery Bug Found in Suriname

It may or may not be a new species, but this crazy-haired bug is an eye popper of a planthopper.

New Species of Giant Air-Breathing Fish: Freshwater Species of the Week

Water Currents previously reported on Donald Stewart‘s ongoing efforts to reclassify a giant Amazonian fish as representing several distinct species. The work of the fish biologist at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) is supported in part by National Geographic. Stewart’s latest work has just been published in the journal Copeia, and marks…

New Eyeless Fungus Beetle Found in Cave

A new species of eyeless insect adapted to the darkness has been discovered in an Arizona cave, a new study says.

The Return of Grand Cayman’s Blue Iguana: From Near-Extinction to Endangered

In 2002, between 10-25 blue iguanas remained in the wild. Today, there are 750. By incubating eggs in his home office and gathering plants to feed the baby blues, Fred Burton and his team have brought back a species that was nearly extinct. While these 5-foot-long majestic creatures are still a rare sight, they are…

Endangered “Demon Primate” Genome Sequenced

According to local legends in Madagascar, the aye-aye lemur is a demon that can kill just by pointing a finger. That sounds mythical, but for insects inside tree trunks, there is truth to the killing part. The nocturnal aye-aye uses its multipurpose middle finger to tap forest wood in search of its meals (see above…

An Ode to the Odd and Obscure

Ever heard of the Macaya breast-spot frog? Didn’t think so. It’s one of many obscure organisms that made the hundred most threatened species list, which was announced today at the World Conservation Congress.

How We’re Endangering Animals [Infographic]

Wildlife face many threats around the world, from poaching to habitat loss. Global climate change also threatens to destabilize already stressed ecosystems. This infographic takes a quick look at some of the biggest threats, as well as some of the better known species under assault. Unfortunately, for every charismatic animal listed — polar bears, penguins,…

New Frog Discovered in NYC: Freshwater Species of the Week

Although the discovery of a previously unknown species is never routine, it is at least more expected in remote corners of the globe, from the deep Amazon to Pacific atolls. But few people expect to find a new species in New York City! (Except perhaps a mutated cockroach or sewer rat.) But scientists from UCLA,…

Photographing the BioBlitz

Kevin FitzPatrick is a wildlife conservation photographer who specializes in shooting BioBlitzes. I found him at the 2011 BioBlitz in the Saguaro National Park, Arizona, where he told me why he has developed a passion for documenting the special species count in our national parks.

“Unknown” Flies Found in 2011 BioBlitz Park

A two-week sampling of flies in the Saguaro National Park yielded hundreds of specimens, many of them yet to be described scientifically. John Francis, National Geographic’s Vice President for Research, Conservation, and Exploration, talked to Mike Irwin at the recent BioBlitz in the park.