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September 7, 2014: Walking Through Conflict Zones, Driving 200 Miles Per Hour and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dodge whales and pirates on the Indian Ocean, track poachers in Africa, find lost societies in Orkney, shed light on glowing sharks, harmonize with melting ice in Antarctica, live underwater for 31 days, follow in the pawprints of a lone wolf for 1,200 miles, and rove across the red planet.

July 6, 2014 Show: Whales vs. the United States Navy, and Visiting Every Country in the World

Traveling to every country in the world without flying. One man’s journey around the globe was punctuated by only a few stops in jail. And another man documents the fight in the United States Supreme Court between the Navy and whale conservationists who want to keep some parts of the oceans safe for the large marine mammals.

Ancient Voices Through a Modern Microphone

Hear what indigenous cultures have to say regarding the health of our rivers, and what we need to do to live in better harmony with our natural surroundings.

No Break for South Sudan: Clinic Goes Up, Violence Rains Down

As South Sudan struggles with recent violence and a tense ceasefire, Alaskans of the Alaska Sudan Medical Project reach out to their long-time friends in Africa, and continue to support the clinic that makes Old Fangak a haven for the sick, displaced, and injured.

South Sudan: Oil, the Environment and Border Conflicts

In this guest-article, Dr. Tore Knos, member of the Disaster Aid USA  Response Team and its Board of Directors, and Dr. Michele Zebich-Knos, Professor Emeritus at Kennesaw State University and former Director of the International Policy Master’s Program, discuss the current situation in South Sudan and how long-term strife affects the environment. This blog post…

From Alaska With Love: Aid Helps African Clinic Recover From Fire

A fire devastates a nearly completed medical clinic in Africa, but an outpouring of support from Alaska and elsewhere aid a quick recovery and have a more-than-material impact on the community.

Independence Day in South Sudan

As Americans celebrate the Fourth of July each year with cookouts, concerts, and fireworks, it is almost easy to forget the holiday’s connection with the nation’s independence and the struggles to achieve it. Surely that was not the case on July 4, 1777. On its first anniversary the United States was still a young republic, with a war yet to be won to solidify the unalienable rights deemed “self-evident” in Thomas Jefferson’s enduring declaration. Much uncertainty likewise surrounded the new nation of the Republic of South Sudan this July as it celebrated its own first year of independence….

Pay As You Go Sunshine: How Solar Energy and Mobile Phones are Powering the Developing World

Every night, something unusual happens in Samuel Kimani’s home on the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya. Samuel, 48, lives with his wife Mary and their three children. Their family supports itself day-to-day through their main source of income, their cow Baraka, whose milk is collected daily and sold directly to customers for about $1.80 a day.…

Kony 2012: A New Video, and Lessons Learned

Invisible Children has released a new film in its Kony2012 campaign, one that, unlike its predecessor, puts the focus on the countries in central Africa where the murderous Lord’s Resistance Army is currently operating. The filmmakers clearly hope to make the most of the phenomenal reach of the first Kony2012 video, which has garnered more than 90 million views since it launched one month ago, and to address some of the fierce criticism the campaign attracted.

Kony 2012: A View from Northern Uganda

A former child soldier of the Lord’s Resistance Army responds to the clamor over Invisible Children and Kony 2012, the NGO’s campaign against Joseph Kony and the LRA.

New Global Land Rush Trampling Human Rights

It is an age-old story in the developing world, one that rarely ends happily ever after.  Communities without economic power that live off of land to which they do not “own” are devastated when their government transfers the property rights to wealthy outside interests, who exploit the natural resources. These land deals often result in…

Two States: Mass Murder in South Sudan

A year after voting for independence, South Sudan is at war with itself. A culture of cattle-raiding, twisted by automatic weapons, has caused thousands of deaths.

“The Village”: A Look at Life in South Sudan

South Sudan, the world’s newest country, is also a country with the greatest of needs. Now that independence has been achieved, the real work begins. Fortunately, through the kindness of several determined Alaskans, the work is being helped along, slowly but steadily.

Can the Nile River Slake all Thirsts?

Dan Morrison’s book, The Black Nile, chronicles his journey along the Nile River from its source at Lake Victoria to its mouth 3,600 miles later at the Mediterranean Sea. National Geographic News Watch interviews him about his journey and his travel writing.