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What’s an Acre of Seagrass Worth? $80,000 in Fish Alone

By Philine zu Ermgassen, postdoctoral fellow at Cambridge University and Dr. Mark Spalding, senior scientist with The Nature Conservancy For decades, dire tales of collapsing fish stocks were told, only to fall on deaf ears. Then, in a 2008 report, “Sunken Billions,” the World Bank and the FAO began to couch the problem in entirely…

2013: Making Strides toward Sustainable Tuna

By Susan Jackson and Holly Koehler Across the globe, as populations soar, a growing number of people are relying on seafood for their nutrition and their livelihood. Tuna is one of the most popular species of seafood, and the industry surrounding it is an economic engine for countless communities. With competing interests at play, and…

For Delicious, Healthy, and Sustainable Seafood, Think Inside the Can

In my role as director of the Healthy and Sustainable Food program at Harvard’s Center for Health and the Global Environment, I am often asked, “What should be for dinner?” Unfortunately, the answer is not always so easy. Sustainable seafood is a complicated topic, one that depends on myriad variables, making a trip to the seafood…

Blue Sea Labs, Cryoocyte, and Ho’oulu Pacific Win Fish 2.0 Business Competition

Impact investors gather to learn about seafood start-ups Investors interested in both doing well and doing good gathered at Stanford University last week to hear over 20 sustainable seafood start-ups pitch their enterprises in our Fish 2.0 Competition Finals and Investor Ideas Exchange. The mix of people was exciting – I’ve worked with investors and…

Geography in the News: Bluefin Tuna Decline

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Bluefin Tuna in Decline The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), an international agreement between governments, dealt a serious blow to the Atlantic bluefin tuna in March 2010. The convention voted to deny a proposed international ban on fishing and trading the…

Shaping Businesses That Can Help Both People and the Planet

Sustainable businesses have made huge strides in areas like improving access to renewable energy and improving health outcomes for the world’s poor, and we believe there’s an opportunity in the seafood sector as well. The big question is, how do we help seafood entrepreneurs design businesses that have positive social and environmental impacts? How can…

Innovating the Business of Seafood for Communities & Health

By Amanda Nagai Certifications and barcode trackers can help shoppers identify seafood at the fish counter, but for consumers who really want to know what they’re eating, the real key may be genuine relationships with the people who hauled in the catch. From Alaska to San Francisco to Boston, conservationist Native Americans, seafood entrepreneurs, and nonprofit…

Fukushima Fallout Not Affecting U.S.-Caught Fish

This article was originally published by the Center for American Progress. In recent weeks, there has been a significant uptick in news from Fukushima, Japan. Officials from the Japanese government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, admitted that radioactive water is still leaking from the nuclear plant crippled by the 2011 earthquake and…

Social Entrepreneurs and Investors Explore Sustainable Oceans Sector

Early next month, entrepreneurs, investors, and other thought leaders will gather at the annual Social Capital Markets meeting in San Francisco. Known to many as SOCAP, this annual meeting started over five years ago. It focuses on using capital markets to advance social well-being and has covered topics ranging from mobile phone technology to agricultural…

Edible QR Codes Make Sustainable Sushi Fun and Convenient

Guests at the upscale Harney Sushi in San Diego now get a little something extra with their fresh tuna and crab rolls: edible QR (quick response) codes. When scanned with a smart phone or tablet, the codes take users to the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) FishWatch website, where they can learn about the sustainability of the seafood they…

“My Village, My Lobster” Film Exposes Extreme Danger Behind a Favorite Seafood

My Village, My Lobster profiles the dangerous lives of those who dive for lobster off the Caribbean coast of Central America. The toll to put food on (mostly American) plates is considerable, as divers face death and disability from decompression sickness (the bends)–brought on by improper equipment and very long work hours.

Despite the risks, economic opportunities are scarce. Fortunately, there are also safer alternatives on the horizon.

Chilean Seabass Goes From “Take a Pass” to “Take a Bite”?

By Alison Barratt of Monterey Bay Aquarium Is it really OK to eat Chilean seabass? For nearly a decade, we’ve been hearing “Take a pass on Chilean Seabass,” that pirates are plundering our oceans to put this fish on our plates. And now the Seafood Watch program at the Monterey Bay Aquarium is saying some of it…

Spring Means Crawfish Boils in Louisiana

Though farming has provided year-round crawfish, Louisianans abide by spring traditions.

Plenty Of Fish In The Sea? It’s The Law!

By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown In the 1990’s many U.S. fisheries found themselves in crisis. The fish they relied on were deeply depleted from decades of getting caught faster than they could reproduce. After years of bitter argument and concerted conservation-group efforts, Congress in 1996 passed a sweeping set of amendments to the federal…

Labeling & Local Seafood

By Sean Dixon, Co-Founder, Village Fishmonger NYC Recently highlighted in a great Ocean Views post by Brian Howard, an Atlantic article, and the New York Times, a report by ocean advocacy organization Oceana once again exposed a fatal flaw in the U.S.’s seafood economy: mislabeling. Labels In the world of seafood, mislabeling generally means one…