National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for science

Two National Marine Sanctuaries May More Than Double in Size

Two national marine sanctuaries along the Northern California coast, renown for their rich animal life, may more than double in size if NOAA has its way.

Celebrating East African Pollinator Diversity!

Dear All Many greetings from the rainforest in Western Kenya! Am very pleased to share with you a recently complete book featuring and celebrating pollinator diversity in East Africa. You can download the book through link by clicking on the cover image below: Click on image above to go to the page where you can…

Of Sharks and Men: An Expedition to Study Shark Ecology and Movement Patterns in Fiji

“At first, there were just two or three and they just circled us. Each day moving a little bit closer. We would just sit on the bottom…and wait,” Papa says, his voice quieting for effect like a trained storyteller trying to excite a group of boy scouts around a campfire. Manasa Bulivou, or ‘Papa’, is…

IPCC Report Shares Dire News, Some Adaptation Measures

Climate change risks dramatically increase the more Earth warms, but reducing greenhouse gas emissions lowers the risk of the most unwelcome consequences, according to the latest report from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). “We have assessed impacts as they are happening on the natural and human systems on all continents,” said IPCC Chairman Rajendra Pachauri. “In…

The Expedition Begins: A Study of Shark Ecology and Movement Patterns in Fiji

The best adventures begin as dreams, and for me, this trip is no different. My dream started over a bad cup of instant coffee and a moderately difficult Sudoku puzzle in my living room in Rarotonga, Cook Islands. It was March 2012 and I was entrenched in a grass roots campaign to outlaw possession of…

Citizen Scientists Make Lasting Contributions to Iguana Research and Conservation

Guest post by Rebecca Gericke, conservation and research programs manager, Shedd Aquarium    Comprised of over 700 islands, cays and rocks, the Bahamas is largely considered a maritime nation. When you think of the Bahamas, you may picture clear blue water, endless white sand beaches and pristine coral reefs teeming with colorful marine life, but the…

Alternate Reality Game Eavesdrops On Climate Changed Future

By Darrell Owens The year is 20XX: Dallas is covered in 30 inches of snow, San Francisco is experiencing mild tornadoes, and Greenland has become a tropical paradise. At least, this is what inhabitants of possible futures are saying in the new alternate reality game, Future Coast. Future Coast is the brainchild of game designer…

What’s an Acre of Seagrass Worth? $80,000 in Fish Alone

By Philine zu Ermgassen, postdoctoral fellow at Cambridge University and Dr. Mark Spalding, senior scientist with The Nature Conservancy For decades, dire tales of collapsing fish stocks were told, only to fall on deaf ears. Then, in a 2008 report, “Sunken Billions,” the World Bank and the FAO began to couch the problem in entirely…

Air Pollution Now Top Environmental Health Risk

New analysis from the World Health Organization (WHO) links exposure to air pollution to roughly 7 million deaths annually. The report confirms that air pollution is now the world’s largest environmental health risk. It estimates 4.3 million people died in 2012—mainly due to cooking inside with coal or wood stoves. Another 3.7 million died from outdoor pollution, including…

Hands-on STEM Learning: Northern Skies Observatory

A seventh grader sitting at the computer control desk at an observatory in a small Vermont town comments to her fellow student: “I can’t believe I am in charge of this telescope!” The 17-inch PlaneWave reflecting telescope, complete with its supporting state-of-the-art equipment and robotic software, was displaying images of a galaxy 2.3 million light-years…

Reports, Website Document Effects of and Need for Dialogue on Climate Change

Last year, carbon dioxide briefly passed the 400 parts per million milestone. Now, says Ralph Keeling of the Scripps Institution for Oceanography, we’re on track to “see values dwelling over 400 in April and May. It’s just a matter of time before it stays over 400 forever.” This pronouncement comes the same week the American Association for the…

From Night Vision to Heaters, 3 of the Ocean’s Most Remarkable Eyes

This post is reprinted, with permission, from The Extreme Life of the Sea, by Stephen Palumbi and Tony Palumbi, Princeton University Press 2014. Evolution throws countless designs at the proverbial wall and steps back to see what sticks. All that evolution really needs is a big, variable population to experiment on and a lot of…

All-Night Senate Session Focuses on Climate Change

In the last 100 years, senators have held all-night sessions 35 times on everything from the Civil Rights Act to the Iraq War. This week, climate change made the list as number 36. The more than 14-hour session, which began Monday night, was organized by the Climate Action Task Force. Dubbed an avenue to voice concerns over the issue that has…

Some Ancient Sloths Ventured Into the Ocean, Study Says

A new study finds that dense bones enabled aquatic sloths to sink to shallow seagrass beds in order to graze.

Orion Star Factory May Be Deadly to Planets

  The Great Orion Nebula not only looks like a giant star factory, but new research suggests it also is a destroyer of young worlds. New high-frequency radio observations obtained through the radio telescopes at the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in northern Chile show for the first time that the giant gas cloud, located…