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Obama May Use Executive Power to Forge International Climate Change Deal as U.N. Draft Report Paints Stark Climate Picture

A leaked draft of a report by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warns that global warming is already affecting all continents and that additional pollution from heat-trapping gases will worsen the situation. “Continued emission of greenhouse gases will cause further warming and long-lasting changes in all components of the climate system, increasing the…

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Alligators and Regenerators

How long can alligators live out of the water? Are there more animals out there that can re-grow body parts? Read this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Watch Death Valley’s Rocks Walk Before Your Eyes

Scientist believe they’ve solved the mystery of Death Valley’s “walking” rocks.

4 Videos: Threatened Birds Face Polar Bears, Poop-Sniffing Reporters

The ultimate “canaries in the coal mine,” these threatened birds are giving researchers clues to the kind of world we could lose if climate change ranges unchecked. Watch as these feathered dynamos strut, dance, and sway.

See-Through Frogs With Green Bones Discovered in Peru

Researchers discover four new species of frog in the Peruvian Andes, three of which are see-through.

Watch: Grouper Slurps Down A Shark, Not A Typical Meal

A massive grouper gobbles down a shark in one bite. The unfortunate victim seems to have been a meal of opportunity rather than part of a steady diet, according to an expert.

Court Ruling Could Affect Nation’s Electric Grid

Editor’s Note: While Tim Profeta is on vacation, Jeremy Tarr, policy associate in the Climate and Energy Program at Duke’s Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, will author The Climate Post. Tim will post again August 28. A unanimous ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit could change the way utilities and regulators consider electricity…

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Pterosaurs vs. Dinosaurs, Spider Venom, and a Wasp’s “Drill Bit”

What was really the biggest flying dinosaur? Where do wasps get their zinc drill tips? Read this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Antelope and Lion Have Unlikely Meeting—Only One Walks Away

Two National Geographic-funded researchers working on different projects, were in for a surprise when they checked the tracking collar data on a lion and a kudu they were separately following.

Can Artificial Insemination Save Endangered Species?

Assisted reproduction is becoming one of the tools conservationists use to help manage endangered species populations.

Mystery Solved: How Snakes Climb Trees

Researchers discover that for snakes climbing trees, it’s all about safety first.

Longtime Sea Urchin Diving Partners Lead the Way in Sea Kelp Restoration, Technology and Collaboration

By Leanne Weiss Terry Herzik (67), Gary Thompson (71), and Lucy, Gary’s 8-year-old Chihuahua, board the Sunstar at dawn with enough food and fuel for the next three days. As they pull away, in their 34-foot vessel the sun is just beginning to rise over Fish Harbor, in San Pedro, Los Angeles. They’ll head southwest…

Female Turtles “Talk” to Their Hatchlings, Scientists Discover

New research finds that female giant South American river turtles “talk” to their hatchlings.

Whales and Dolphins Squeal With Delight, Study Finds

Whales and dolphins express their anticipation of a reward by squealing like kids, a new study confirms for the first time.

How Do Glowing Sharks See in the Dark? New Surprises Revealed

Researchers discover special structures in deep sea shark eyes that allow the animals to navigate their gloomy environment.