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January 19, 2014: Waging War Against Whalers, Paragliding Above Pakistan and More

Join host Boyd Matson as he and his guests sleep high on sheer mountain cliffs, wage war against whalers, consume bacteria in pursuit of better health, crash during paragliding takeoff in Pakistan, eat invasive species, and photograph 30 years of warfare in Afghanistan.

Study Says United States Tops List of Global Warming Offenders

A new study by Canadian researchers finds the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom, China, Russia, and developing nations Brazil and India were responsible for more than 60 percent of global temperature changes between 1906 and 2005. The U.S. alone was responsible for 22 percent of the warning; China followed at 9 percent and Russia at 8 percent. Brazil…

Geography in the News: Polar Bears

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Polar Bears on the Run The world’s polar bears are becoming more and more threatened, not from predation, as they have no natural predators except humans, but from global warming. A book entitled On Thin Ice: The Changing World of the Polar Bear by…

December 15, 2013: Paddling Through The World’s Biggest Rapids, Swimming in the World’s Coldest Oceans and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend, host Boyd Matson joins guests as they paddle the world’s biggest rapids, dive in the world’s coldest oceans (at both poles), and walk “Out of Eden,” chasing our early human ancestors to the ends of the Earth.

December 8, 2013: Discovering Record Setting Remains, Climbing Antarctic Peaks and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we uncover a trove of pre-human remains deep inside a South African cave, then we coach kids to fulfill their destiny as Antarctic adventurers, and finally, we peer deep into space to watch galaxies collide.

November 17, 2013: Horse-Riding Across Asia, Roadtripping America With a Canine Copilot and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson, as we ride 6,000 miles across Central Asia, collect chicken feces to protect bees from wasps, cycle across Iceland, ponder the moose’s plight, and drive to every state with a canine copilot.

Rapid Reflections on Russia

From October 18 to 22, 2013, I had an opportunity to participate in an intensive series of meetings and site visits organized by the World Economic Forum’s network of “Young Global Leaders.” Special thanks to the program organizers Yana Peel and Yan Yanovskiy who graciously hosted the program. The program operated under Chatham House Rules…

Giant Chunk of Russian Meteor Recovered

Russian scientists appear to have pulled up a half-ton charred meteorite from the bottom of a murky Siberian lake—a piece of the giant space rock that exploded in the skies above the southern Urals in February.

September 22, 2013: Paddling the Americas, Blind Date Adventures, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, as we pursue adrenaline and white water throughout the Americas, blind date for 200 miles down Alaska’s Lost Coast, and learn to thrive despite past failures.

September 8, 2013: Paddling Through Russia’s Remotest Rivers, Playing Matchmaker for Rhinos, and More

Join us this week, as we paddle 3,000 miles through the remotest rivers in Mongolia and Russia, try to help in Syria’s civil war by starting a children’s camp for refugees, create a dating game for rhinos, film Africa’s disappearing megafauna, and ride hogs across the United States.

August 11, 2013: Holding our Breath in Underwater Caves, Biking Across Kyrgyzstan Mountains, and More

Join us this week, as we explore the labyrinth of underwater caves deep under Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula for clues of its Mayan past, cycle solo through Central Asian mountain passes to climb remote peaks, and debunk American historical myths from the Wild West to the Surfin’ Safari.

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM THE GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISIONS OF EUROPE AND ASIA Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing.   Most students of history,…

World Heritage and Climate Change: Lessons From Indigenous Peoples of Altai, Russia

Shaman Maria Amanchina stands over the tomb of the Ukok Princess Kadyn. Photo © Gleb Raygorodetsky. The sacred Ukok Plateau at the heart of the Golden Mountains of Altai World Heritage Site, Russia, is changing because of climate. For local people, dealing with climate change means restoring and sustaining the role of the ancestral burial kurgans…

May 26, 2013: Staying Safe Going Up Mountains, Injuries Flying Down Cliffs and More

This week, we chat with Conrad Anker who reflects on how difficult it is for even the best climbers to avoid disaster on Everest, Jon Jenkins who is scouring the deepest reaches of the universe looking for signs of intelligent life, and daredevil Angela Proudfoot who skydives against all odds after sustaining a serious base jumping injury.

Geography in the News: The Caucasus’ Storied Cultural Geography

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com CHECHNYA AND THE CAUCASUS REGION Among the world’s longest-lived hotspots is the Caucasus region, rivaling only the Balkans as a volatile kettle of violent and rebellious ethnic cultures. Attention is now focused on Chechnya and the Caucasus region because of the ethnicity…