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In Palm Oil’s Wake: an interview with Robert Hii

Do you have a story to share about how you’re helping save the world? Do you want to tell YOUR story about biodiversity and what it means to you? If you’re interested in connecting the human animal to the global ecosystem, submit content to Izilwane–Voices for Biodiversity! We’ve all heard the news about palm oil.…

Old Growth Rainforest—What Still Stands is More Valuable Than Ever

No matter where I have traveled in the world, I have found that the many of the larger stretches of primeval forests can only be reached by logging roads. Consider the old growth stands of Sitka spruce and red cedar in the Carmanah Valley, on a remote part of southeast Vancouver Island.  Canada’s tallest tree,…

Of Palm Oil and Extinction

You know the old question: If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around, does it make a noise? I’m not quite sure why that question came to mind when news came out of the extinction of Dipterocarpus coriaceus, or keruing paya, in West Malaysia. Perhaps because the extinction of an iconic…

Petitioning Starbucks: Stop selling baked goods containing palm oil!

Save Wildlife—Pass on Starbucks Pastries This month, Izilwane–Voices for Biodiversity is teaming up with primatologist Paula Pebsworth in her campaign against Americans’ hunger for environmentally destructive palm oil. She has received a good deal of support in her work, but one notable hold out: Starbucks, a company known (perhaps surprisingly) for it social activism. Over…

Carbon Dioxide Milestone Revised by NOAA

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced last week that carbon dioxide concentrations at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii surpassed the milestone 400 parts per million for a sustained period. NOAA has since revised the figure—on the basis of computer analysis—saying its May 9 readings actually remained fractions of a point below the historic level, coming in at…

Amazon Waters: Conserving Wildlife, Securing Livelihoods

Threats to the Amazon come not only from deforestation, but also from dams, roads, human-induced climate change, gold mining, petroleum extraction, shipping and the unplanned growth of cities, whose expanding populations consume more and more of the Amazon River’s resources.

Bushmeat: Every Man’s Protein until the Forest is Empty…

Some call it the “African silence” when a forest is struck silent by poaching and the bushmeat trade. Others call this phenomenon “dead zones” that have no birds, no monkeys, no small mammals, no snakes… These places have been stripped bare by local communities that are struggling to feed their families and access medical care.…

Jaguars Battling in the Darkness: Sense of place in the Peruvian Amazon…

Like the other remaining wilderness areas around the world, the vast Peruvian Amazon has become ring-fenced by land conversion for pastures, rampant logging, commercial forestry, mining, dams, agricultural development, and other drivers of global trade and development. This vast wilderness that seemed impossible to destroy or harm is under threat and in decline… Listen here…

More Sightings, Violence Around Uncontacted Tribes

Recent attacks by isolated tribesmen have left one man dead and another wounded in the wilds of southeastern Peru. But what’s causing the increase in conflict?

Ten Years After 9/11 – Canada’s True Cost of Oil

The unseen environmental costs of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001