National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for psychology

Visualizing the Psychology of Attraction

Asking “how do we capture attention,” this infographic from Iconic Displays makes a brief survey of the science of attraction. In college, my friend and roommate worked on a research project in this area. At the time, he told me that much of attraction is about symmetry, with the underlying biological assumption that organisms with better symmetry…

Addiction Fact and Fiction

National Geographic Channel has been running a number of programs on drugs and addictions, including the show Drugged (see 10 tips for recovering from addictions). Addiction is a strange beast that has devastated millions of people and families around the world. It’s also in the news a lot, from allegations of sex addict stars to the…

Liar, Liar, Nose on Fire!

New research from the University of Granada’s Department of Experimental Psychology makes it as plain as the nose on your face: When people lie, their noses get hotter. Nicknamed the “Pinocchio effect,” the phenomenon was observed during a study that applied thermography to psychology to see what the body’s temperature could reveal about the mind.…

Hanging in the Rainforest Not as Fun as It Used to Be? It Might Be a Midlife Crisis.

When people begin to worry about their mortality, they might fight the blues by buying a fancy sports car, having an affair, or even getting a toupee. But, what is a great ape to do?

Innocent Until Proven Pretty

A study finds that beautiful women are more likely to be viewed as guilty in cases involving the murder of abusive partners.

Being Lonely May Be A Hazard To Your Health

Being alone doesn’t just feel bad. It’s bad for you. This is the conclusion of two recent studies that examined the link between feelings of loneliness the risk of mortality.

Why Tearjerkers Cheer Us up

As strange as it sounds, there may be nothing so good as a sad movie to lift your spirits.

Hawaii Named Happiest State in New Poll

Life getting you down? Maybe it’s time to go to Hawaii. According to the results of a recent poll by Gallup, Hawaii’s residents are the happiest people in the United States.

Selfishness? There’s an App for That

Do cellphones make people selfish? If you’ve ever had to shush a garrulous iPhone user in the seat next to you at the movie theater, the answer may seem obvious. And now, a new study confirms our phone fears.

Simple Names Are Better When It Comes To Getting Ahead

What your parents choose to call you may influence your life long after grade school is over. A new study has found that people with simple names are more likely to be promoted at work than those with names that are more difficult to say

Visualizing the Psychology of Color

Courtesy of Painters of Louisville   At National Geographic, we are dedicated to unique and engaging forms of visual storytelling. Colors, of course, can be a powerful medium to convey meaning and trigger emotions. Think of the little girl in the red dress in the otherwise black and white Schindler’s List, or the captivating color…

Exposure to “Love Hormone” Increases Prosocial Behavior in Monkeys

Oxytocin may not sound like something warm and fuzzy, but the hormone can make monkeys be nicer to other monkeys, according to researchers at Duke University.

A Gorilla Walks Into a Room . . .

Since 1989 more than 250 convicted criminals have been exonerated based on DNA evidence. About 75% of those exonerations came in cases where eyewitnesses had misidentified the subject or the events. Why are witness accounts so unreliable?

The Psychology of What Makes Teens Thankful

The study of gratitude is a burgeoning field within psychology, and across the board, results show that people who are more thankful are less prone to stress and depression and are, well, happier. Researchers say one group that could use a lot more gratitude is teenagers. Youth Radio Investigates reporter Rayana Godfrey set out to determine why.

The Upside to Embarrassment

Blushing’s not so bad. A recent study by psychologists found that people who are easily embarrassed are more likely to be trusted than individuals who are harder to fluster.