National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for Pop Omnivore

Six Spot-On Cultural Insights from Greg and Amy Poehler’s “Welcome to Sweden”

Amy Poehler and her brother Greg know that moving is hard. Moving to a country where you don’t speak the language or understand the local customs is even harder . . . and sometimes hilarious.  The Poehler siblings, who are co-Executive Producers for “Welcome to Sweden,” are counting on this fish-out-of-water discomfort to drive their…

And the Emmy Might Go To … Nat Geo’s Easter Island Video “Walking with Giants”

How did people who lived centuries ago on remote Easter Island (Rapa Nui) move the multi-ton statues they created? It’s one of the isolated island’s persistent mysteries, and the focus of fierce academic debate and popular disagreement. Last July, National Geographic Magazine published a cover story highlighting recent research on Easter Island’s archaeology. One theory…

What the “Arrested Development” Chicken Dance Really Says About the Bluth Family

The dysfunctional Bluth family returns this Sunday with 15 new episodes of the canceled sitcom Arrested Development via Netflix. And you know what that means: more chicken dancing! Arrested Development is built on recurring jokes but one of the biggest crowd-pleasers of all is the Bluth family chicken dance, deployed to taunt other family members,…

National Geographic HQ Makes a Scene on the FX Spy Series The Americans

  If you’ve been watching the FX network’s retro spy series, The Americans, which has its season finale tonight, you may or may not have noticed a recurring cameo by the National Geographic headquarters building as seen from the window of the show’s FBI headquarters (that’s us in the picture above, with our flat roof…

Truth or Hype: Deconstructing “Don’t Frack My Mother”

“Don’t Frack My Mother.” That’s the title of a catchy folk song now making the web rounds, written by Beatles scion Sean Lennon and performed by Yoko Ono, Liv Tyler, and assorted other celebrities. The song is intended to send a message to New York governor Andrew Cuomo, who will decide, likely later this month,…

Nicolaus Copernicus Gets a Google Doodle … And Here’s Why

Copernicus got a Google Doodle! The late, great astronomer, whose birthday is today, February 19, would perhaps be puzzled by Google – but only for a second. Nicolaus Copernicus was never one to shy away from new ideas (get a modern astronomer’s take on Copernicus). If you’d like a little primer on why Copernicus deserves…

The World of Eco-Comics: A Hapless Manatee, Self-aware Dogs, a Chain-Smoking Pig

Pop Omnivore visited the Small Press Expo (SPX) in Bethesda, Maryland, looking for environmentally minded comics. Here’s what we found…

‘For Greater Glory’: Mexico’s War for Religious Freedom Is In a New Movie — and In Family Memories

The movie For Greater Glory depicts a war that many Americans have never heard of: Mexico’s Cristero War of 1926–1929, aka La Cristiada. The war began when president Plutarco Elias Calles started enforcing anti-religious sections of the country’s constitution. For NGM intern Antonia Rico, the war is familiar…

The Mona Lisa…On An Etch-A-Sketch?

If you follow politics, you’ve probably noticed that a certain character with classic good looks and black-and-white views (a bit square, you might say) has drawn a lot of attention this week. No, not that guy…we’re talking about the Etch-A-Sketch! The classic toy is famous for its transience—just shake it to start afresh—but did you…

“21 Jump Street” Is Right: Environmentalists Are Now the Cool Kids in High School!

In the new movie 21 Jump Street, two young cops are sent back to high school as undercover police officers. The pair are shocked to find that in the few years they’ve been away, the social strata have been seismically restructured: Biking to school, recycling and otherwise showing concern for the environment makes you a Cool Kid. To find out whether this depiction of the new cool is accurate, Pop Omnivore spoke with National Geographic Emerging Explorer Juan Martinez.

Women Hold Up Half the Sky—and Some Amazing Films

This weekend, National Geographic’s All Roads Film Project presents the film series, Women Hold Up Half the Sky, notable films by award-winning female directors, screening at NG headquarters in Washington, D.C. Here are previews of three of the films, “My Wedding and Other Secrets,” “Here I Am,” and “A Small Act.”

Why Movies Like Oscar-Winning ‘Undefeated’ Make Grown Men (and Women) Cry

The newly minted Oscar winner for best documentary, Undefeated, has left many critics gushing—with praise, but also tears. The true-life sports tale follows a struggling high school football team in a poor area of Memphis, Tennessee, whose fortunes begin to turn under the guidance of a devoted and determined coach. The emotional story has reduced…

Valley of Saints: Finding The Beauty In Kashmir

Among the winners at this year’s Sundance Film Festival was Valley of Saints, an environmental drama that casts light on the toll that human habitation and tourism have taken on Kashmir’s lovely Dal Lake. The plot centers around a boatman named Gulzar and his best friend, who are planning to run away from the conflict…

After the Super Bowl, Everyone’s Curious About Slacklining

If you saw the Super Bowl halftime show, you probably wondered, “Who’s that guy in a toga bouncing crazily on a rope next to Madonna? And how’s he doing it?” The guy was Andy Lewis, a slacklining champion from California, and he did it after many, many years of practice. Slacklining is different from tightrope…

Would Real Wolves Act Like the Wolves of ‘The Grey’?

The nominal star of movie The Grey is Liam Neeson. The real stars are the CGI-enhanced hungry wolves that pursue him and his fellow plane-crash survivors through Alaska’s pristine wilderness. But is their behavior based in reality? To parse wolf fact from fiction, we caught up with Daniel MacNulty, a wildlife-ecology professor at Utah State University…