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Dogs Get Jealous, Too

Jealousy in canines probably evolved to protect important social bonds in the pack, according to a new paper.

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: Animal Eyes

From cats to clams, the animal kingdom literally has many different ways of seeing things. This week on Ask Your Weird Animal Questions, we’re taking a visionary look at nature.

Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: The Truth About Your Cats

Why do cats like stinky shoes? Can clipping a cat’s claws stop it from scratching? Our weekly column examines feline mysteries.

Q&A: What Animal Mental Illness Tells Us About Humans

Mental illness doesn’t only affect humans: Animals like dogs and cats suffer from anxiety, dementia, and even phobias, according to a new book.

May 4, 2014: Driving to the World’s Coldest Cities and Cracking the Humor Code

The winter of 2014 was long and cold in many parts of North America. But even the most frigid midwestern temperatures would be considered mild to Oymyakon, Russia’s 472 residents. One of the candidates for the “Coldest Town in the World,” Felicity Aston visited the Siberian hamlet in the middle of winter to learn how its residents deal with sustained temperatures of -76 degrees Fahrenheit. On her 18,000 mile “Pole of Cold” drive from London to Europe and Asia’s coldest places, Aston learned that the residents love winter, because it often provides them with their livelihood, it connects them with nearby towns by letting them drive over frozen lakes and rivers. She also gives tips on how to get a car to start when the mercury dips nearly 100 degrees below freezing.

April 27, 2014: Tragedy on Everest, Rowing Across the Pacific, Wrestling Mongolians and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week his guests reflect on the dangers of climbing Mount Everest after the recent tragedy, row a boat across the oceans and bike across continents to circumnavigate the globe, discover what it is like to be a kid in Mongolia, learn what happened This Weekend In History, detect land mines in Cambodia, travel in style with your dog companion, discover new ways which drug trafficking is cutting down the rainforest, gave through space and time with the world’s most powerful satellite array, and understand why Sherpas climb deadly peaks on Wild Chronicles.

Lab Animals Stressed Out by Men, Study Finds

Men stress out rodents—and probably most other mammals, including furry pets—with the whiff of their armpit sweat, a new study says.

Q&A: What Can Dog Brains Tell Us About Humans?

Canine researcher Ádám Miklósi of the Family Dog Project gets us into the head of the family pooch—and how that could help us learn about our own brains.

Your Weird Animal Questions Answered: Is a Sloth a Good Pet?

Why do dogs chase certain vehicles? Do otters or sloths make good pets? This week we answer your questions about critters closest to home—pets.

Dog Brains Link Pleasure With Owner’s Scent

An owner’s scent activates the parts of a dog’s brain associated with pleasure, a new brain-imaging study says.

Your Hamster May Have Surprising Origins

Hamsters weren’t always spinning on the wheel: There are 26 species of wild hamster, including the Syrian, which was first found near the city of Aleppo.

Do Animals Get Dementia? How to Help Your Aging Pet

Wild animals usually don’t live long enough to suffer cognitive decline, but domestic pets can be susceptible, experts say.

July 21, 2013: Swimming From Cuba to Florida, Developing Deep Sea Diving Suits, and More

This week, join us as we attempt to swim from Cuba to Florida and meet a surprisingly potent form of jellyfish, then we listen to glaciers as they melt and learn what they’re telling us, and we hear protest songs from an indigenous Australian country singer.

How Did a Tortoise Survive 30 Years in a Box?

A Brazilian family recently found their long-lost pet tortoise in a box after 30 years. Find out how the reptile made it through the ordeal.

Saving a Pet Might Just Save Your Life

Although some hardcore animal rights advocates object to the concept of owning any animal, it’s also true that studies have linked responsible pet ownership to lowered stress and increased happiness. With today’s pet industry a booming business worth more than $52 billion a year in the U.S. alone, there are plenty of pampered pooches and…