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Tag archives for paleontology

A New Season for Superglue in the Sea Monster Lab

A new update from the Sea Monster lab in the basement of the Geological Museum in Oslo, Norway, where the specimens of last summer are about finished and new ones are to be cracked open!

T. Rex Museum Move Stymied

What’s powerful enough to stop Tyrannosaurus rex in its tracks? The U.S. government shutdown, which halted the start of a trip for the “Wankel” T. rex from a Montana museum to its new home at the Smithsonian’s Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. The National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,…

SVPCA – the Paleontology Super Bowl

In 2012, the Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum finished off their final field season on Svalbard. After eight consecutive years, the project of locating and excavating marine reptiles from the Upper Jurassic has been a success. Nevertheless, the team is not as dead as the reptiles. Down in…

Kids’ Art Arrives to Brighten Up the Sea Monster Lab

One of the unforeseen benefits of blogging about our research? Visitors who show up with hand-made art to decorate our walls!

Rebuilding a Real Loch Ness Monster–“Gully” the Plesiosaur

See for yourself the pains-taking process of freeing fossils from the rock that has held them for tens of millions of years.

Why Sea Monsters Depend on Toilet Paper

In 2012, the Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum finished off their final field season on Svalbard. Down in the dark basement of the Geological Museum there is a laboratory, where all the prehistoric sea monsters from Svalbard are brought back to life. Believe it or not, toilet paper and sea monster excavation and preparation go hand in hand. Curious? Well here is the explanation.

D.I.Y. in the Sea Monster Lab

The formidable Triforce Sea Monster Preparator Team in the basement of the Geological Musuem in Oslo, decided to take a day off to do some good old D.I.Y. to make their lab more homely.

Excavating Gully, a Real-Life Loch Ness Monster

Now to the second sea monster of the summer, “Gully” the gigantic plesiosaur. An animal so large, that it took two field seasons to excavate. How long do you think it will take to prepare such a beast?

A Headache of a Sea Monster Skull

It is finally time to start on part of the summer’s big project, preparing the ichthyosaur “Mikkel”. We jump into the deep-end and start with the skull. Ichthyosaurs, being reptiles and a more ancient family of vertebrates than us humans, have several more bones in their skulls.

Life in the Sea Monster Lab – Bones & Dubstep

The team has some pretty ambition goals for releasing fossils from their stony tombs this summer. Discover their unconventional methods for getting the job done.

How to Pull a Sea Monster Out of a Rock

In 2012, the Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum finished off their final field season on Svalbard. After eight consecutive years, the project of locating and excavating marine reptiles from the Upper Jurassic has been a success. Nevertheless, the team is not as dead as the reptiles. Down in the dark…

Summer of Sea Monsters

In 2012, the Spitsbergen Jurassic Research Group led by National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jørn Hurum finished off their final field season on Svalbard. After eight consecutive years, the project of locating and excavating marine reptiles from the Upper Jurassic has been a success. Nevertheless, the team is not as dead as the reptiles. Down in the dark…

One Lab, Three Women, and a Lot of Dead Sea Monsters

After 8 years of excavating fossil-filled rocks from the frozen hillsides of Svalbard, two young students chronicle the adventure of finally removing the bones from the stones.

Ancient Embrace: Amphibian, Mammal Ancestor Buried Together

An injured amphibian and a sleeping mammal ancestor shared a home before a flash flood trapped them 250 million years ago, a new study says.

Newfound Bug Ancestor Had Legs Under Mouth

A newfound ancestor of modern bugs has some pretty bizarre traits—its legs are under its mouth, and its spine extends far above its brain, a new study says.