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April 13, 2014: Cutting Cake with Jane Goodall, Saving Sparrows with Photography and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. Please check listings near you to find the best way to listen to National Geographic Weekend on radio, or listen below! Hour 1 - Dr. Jane Goodall pioneered studies that sought to understand…

The Little Dodo of Samoa

The Mauritian dodo is the iconic emblem for both island conservation and extinction, sadly one of the birds lost from the Mascarene archipelago. One might often wonder how this strange bird could have originally been descended from a pigeon, but in Samoa we find the tooth-billed pigeon (Didunculus strigirostris), otherwise known as the little dodo,…

Massive Starfish Die-Off Baffles Scientists

The waters off British Columbia are littered with dead starfish, and researchers have no idea what’s causing it.

September 8, 2013: Paddling Through Russia’s Remotest Rivers, Playing Matchmaker for Rhinos, and More

Join us this week, as we paddle 3,000 miles through the remotest rivers in Mongolia and Russia, try to help in Syria’s civil war by starting a children’s camp for refugees, create a dating game for rhinos, film Africa’s disappearing megafauna, and ride hogs across the United States.

June 23, 2013: Brokering Peace for Elephants, Surfing Down the Baja Coast, and More

This weekend, we learn about how National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Mike Fay made peace between rebel leaders and forest elephants in Central African Republic, we carry water on our back for a 1,000-mile trek down Mexico’s Baja California Coast, and we ride Europe’s rails in comfort.

World’s Largest Shark Sanctuary Protects Cook Islanders’ ‘Guardians’

The Cook Islands established the world’s largest continuous shark sanctuary last month, enforcing heavy fines on violators who are found with any part of a shark on board their vessel in the 1.997 million sq. km (771,000 sq. miles) Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The sanctuary protects all sharks from targeted fishing and aims to prevent possession, sale, and…

Cyclone Season = Change of Plans

The Climate Challenger Voyage is a community initiative inspired by The Nature Conservancy’s Manuai Matawai, who dreamed of building a traditional long voyage canoe and sailing around the Pacific to connect communities grappling with climate change through culture and conservation Two years later, Manuai and nine other crew members—members of the Titan tribe of Papua New Guinea—are…

The Bottom Line: Big Opportunity to Protect the Smallest Pacific Fish

  Our nation’s West Coast is known worldwide for the rich and iconic marine life that can be found off its shores. In fact, countless tourists travel there every year just for a glimpse of a pod of migrating gray whales or the chance to catch a coho or king salmon in the wild. These…

Galapagos Expedition Journal: Swimming with Sea Lions

This is the second post in my account of a ten-day exploration of the Galapagos, on board the National Geographic Endeavour. In the first post, I described our arrival on the island of San Cristobal and our first visit to a Galapagos beach.     We awoke on the first full day of our expedition to…

Pacific Challenges: Urbanization Brings Change and Opportunity to Island Nations

  By Tuiloma Neroni Slade There are few places in the world where population growth and urbanization collide more starkly with vulnerability to climate change and disaster risk than in the Pacific region. As increasing numbers of Pacific Islanders move to towns and cities, the region’s long-standing tradition of rural ‘subsistence affluence’ is being eroded,…

Marshall Islands Declares World’s Largest Shark Sanctuary

The Marshall Islands is now home to the world’s largest shark sanctuary, an area of the central Pacific Ocean four times the size of California, The Pew Environment Group confirmed in a news announcement today. (Read the full announcement.) The Washington-based conservation arm of The Pew Charitable Trusts, a nonprofit that works globally to establish…

Salas y Gómez Expedition: Departing Rapa Nui

As the Salas y Gómez team concludes its work near Easter Island, Chile, and disperses to points around the globe, marine scientist and expedition co-leader Enric Sala looks back on several weeks in one of the most isolated, intriguing, and ecologically unique corners of the vast Pacific. Petroglyphs depicting a tangata manu, or birdman, near…

Costa Rica Expands Marine Protected Area Around Cocos Island

Costa Rica has created a huge new marine park that increases five-fold the area of protected waters surrounding Cocos Island–home to some of the highest abundances of sharks and other large ocean predators recorded anywhere. A loophole that permits long-line fishing in some of the newly protected waters, however, may threaten the park’s sharks, tuna,…

Expedition Near Easter Island, Chile

National Geographic and Oceana scientists, in collaboration with the Chilean Navy, are traveling to their next expedition location–the remote Salas y Gómez Island, some 200 miles (about 323 km) east of Easter Island, Chile, where they will discover what lies beneath these largely unexplored waters. Their backs to the sea, enormous figures called moai carved…

Climate Certainties, Climate Confusion: Kim Cobb at PopTech

Scholars need to do a better job of distinguishing between what’s known (that fossil fuel use warms the planet) and what we’re still learning (what that means in terms of droughts, monsoons, big storms, and other consequences), says climate scientist Kim Cobb. By Ford Cochran Georgia Tech geochemist and climate scientist Kim Cobb is one…