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Ask Your Weird Animal Questions: “Stiletto” Snakes, Cat Purrs

Why does your cat purr? What’s a stiletto snake? Check out this week’s Ask Your Weird Animal Questions.

Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay: When Partnerships Work

By Bob Vanasse Too often, environmental groups, regulators and fishermen find themselves cast in antagonistic roles on marine issues. Prolonged legal and regulatory battles frequently top headlines, while successful conservation partnerships go unheralded. The Chesapeake Bay, long plagued by problems like pollution and runoff, is benefitting from one such partnership. Regional fishermen, government agencies and environmental…

Rule for Regulating Existing Power Plants under Fire

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy testified before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee during a hearing on “EPA’s Proposed Carbon Pollution Standards for Existing Power Plants.” Debate about the proposed rule to regulate carbon emissions from existing power plants has swirled since the rule’s release last month. Coal-heavy states and others have criticized both the…

What Conditions Will Bring More Investors into the Sustainable Seafood Sector?

As sustainable seafood markets grow, philanthropists, nonprofit leaders, and entrepreneurs see opportunities for impact-minded investors to make profits while creating positive change in the oceans. But what makes the conditions right for impact-minded investors to enter a relatively new field such as this one? We have been wrestling with this question in relation to sustainable…

Building on Success

In late fall of 2006, Congress came together to strengthen the primary law that governs our nation’s ocean fisheries—the Magnuson-Stevens Act, originally passed in 1976. A push from leaders on both sides of the aisle, combined with strong support from President George W. Bush, helped overcome political differences. Now the House Committee on Natural Resources…

June 29, 2014: Refueling Satellites in Space, Sequencing the Koala Genome and More

Every week, embark with host Boyd Matson on an exploration of the latest discoveries and interviews with some of the most fascinating people on the planet, on National Geographic Weekend. This week, we walk in space to refuel a satellite, cure koalas of chlamydia, play soccer the Brazilian way, end elephant poaching in Tanzania, run out of air at the bottom of the Arctic Ocean, pair scientists with adventurers, road trip through the American South, and “revisit the Golden Age of Exploration.”

How the “Disco Clam” Lights It Up Underwater

Researchers discover how the disco clam puts on its light shows—and it’s not bioluminescence.

Lionfish Flare Their Fins to Hunt Together

A new study finds that lionfish—those venomous, striped invaders of reefs in the Caribbean and off of Florida—fan their fins to gather a posse while hunting prey.

Senate Clears Way for Keystone XL Pipeline

The U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee voted 12 to 10 on a bill Wednesday approving the long-debated Keystone XL oil pipeline. The pipeline, which would transport oil from Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast, requires presidential approval as it crosses international boundaries. Without a commitment from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to bring it to a vote…

The ABCs of Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management—Part IV

Protecting essential fish habitat: Homes and nurseries On May 29, the House Natural Resources Committee met to refine legislation reauthorizing and amending the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, the primary law that governs fishing in U.S. ocean waters. This is vital work: Our oceans are one of our nation’s most valuable natural resources. And…

June 8, 2014: Diving From 90 Feet Above Havana Bay, Free the Dancing Bears and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they run for peace through the Middle East, honor hero war dogs, play matchmaker for dolphins, safely cycle through crowded city streets, pick the perfect outdoor gear, dive from 90 foot cliffs competitively, recover a 500 year old sunken ship, farm the planet’s oceans, and save a species and a community at the same time.

Restoration Week: Celebrating Science in Action and the Value of Ocean Habitat

Rob Brumbaugh, senior marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy June 1st marks the opening of the Atlantic hurricane season and as a resident of the Florida Keys I know to take every storm seriously and prepare accordingly. Recently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted a “near-normal or below-normal 2014 Atlantic hurricane season,” and while…

Dolphins Guide Scientists to Rescue Suicidal Girl

One day, my research team and I were following a school of bottlenose dolphins near shore as we do on a regular basis in the waters off Los Angeles, California. We just wrapped up our photo-identification work and were moving on to take video of dolphin social interactions and enter data on behavior. The dolphins…

The World’s Largest Migratory Freshwater Fish

May 24th, 2014, marks the first ever World Fish Migration Day—a day created to raise awareness about the great diversity of migratory freshwater fish species, their importance, and the many threats to their populations and ecosystems. Migratory freshwater fish occur worldwide and include many familiar species. And while diadromous fish (fish that move between freshwater…

What’s Making Duck Sounds in the Ocean? Mystery Solved

It may sound quacky, but mysterious duck-like sounds in the oceans are made by whales, a new study says.