National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for ocean

Before the Next Storm: Helping People and Nature Adapt

By Vera Agostini, Senior Marine Scientist, The Nature Conservancy Major hurricanes like Sandy (New Jersey in 2012) and Ivan (Eastern Caribbean in 2004) and Typhoon Haiyan (the Philippines 2013) make global headlines as they hit coastal communities, appropriately drawing attention to the human, financial, and community losses. While some smaller communities may not make global…

Face-to-Face With Ocean Giants

Living on land, interacting mostly only with mammals, it’s hard for most of us to know what it’s like to encounter up-close the strange creatures that dwell beneath the waves. Join two explorers as they share their stories of underwater adventure and inspiration in our next Google+ Hangout.

Indonesia Announces World’s Largest Sanctuary for Manta Rays

The island nation declared a ban on fishing for both species of manta rays that inhabit the country’s exclusive economic zone.

The Vibrant Marine Ecosystem of the Arctic Polar Night

Fresh snow crackles under my feet as I step out of the airplane onto the cluster of Norwegian islands called Svalbard. It´s slightly past noon but still I am looking up at a black sky full of stars and dancing Northern lights. It is so dark that I can hardly see the outlines of the…

Voyage to the Central American Dome, the Forgotten Sea

By Erick Ross Salazar, MarViva MarViva Foundation and Mission Blue have teamed up to seek protection for a high seas “hope spot” called the Central American Dome (CAD). A term coined by Mission Blue founder Sylvia Earle, hope spots are areas of particular conservation concern beneath the waves. The Central American Dome is a biodiverse,…

Photographing the End of the Kreef

Text and photographs by International League of Conservation Photographers Fellow Cheryl-Samantha Owen www.samowenphotography.com “It is currently estimated that numbers of rock lobster on the West Coast of South Africa are perilously low, at only three percent of their original pre-exploitation or pristine levels.” At 4:35 in the morning the faint glow of dawn backlit the…

Peanut Butter and Jellyfish: Delicious Sandwich Ingredient Gets Marine Twist

Staff at a Dallas aquarium wanted to see if they could supplement the diets of their jellies with protein—so they decided to give the animals peanut butter.

Western Australia’s Controversial Shark Cull Claims First Casualty

The controversial program—meant to protect people on Western Australia beaches from shark attacks—claims its first shark fatality.

Dolphin roundup at Japan’s Taiji Cove puts spotlight on changing economics of hunts

Japanese fishermen from the village of Taiji have driven an estimated 200-plus bottlenose dolphins into a local bay made notorious by the 2009 Oscar-winning documentary The Cove. These days, the economics of the hunt are driven less by the market for dolphin meat than by zoos and aquariums.

Electronic Tagging and Tracking Marine Animals Supports Conservation

Understanding and predicting animal movement is important as it is central to establishing effective management and conservation strategies [1]. Until relatively recently, studying the movements and behaviors of highly migratory marine species (turtles, sharks, whales, penguins, seals and billfish) have been challenging due to the logistical and technological constraints of working in aquatic environments. However,…

January 12, 2014: Climbing Buildings, Hunting Poachers and More

Join host National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson and his guests as they climb the world’s tallest buildings, ski with the sport’s inventors, give new life to Christmas trees, seek sea life at the bottom of the ocean, discover the unicorn, protect rhinos by hunting for poachers, kayak blind through the Grand Canyon, prioritize protection plans for endangered species, and track the world’s underground water reserves.

2013: Making Strides toward Sustainable Tuna

By Susan Jackson and Holly Koehler Across the globe, as populations soar, a growing number of people are relying on seafood for their nutrition and their livelihood. Tuna is one of the most popular species of seafood, and the industry surrounding it is an economic engine for countless communities. With competing interests at play, and…

How Ocean Philanthropy Can Change the Tide

By Catharine Cooper and Mark Spalding It’s hard to imagine anyone who has not been changed by an experience of the sea.  Whether it is to walk by her side, swim in her cooling waters, or float on her surface, the vast expanse of our ocean is transformative.  We stand in awe of her majesty.

Will 2014 Be the Year of the Ocean?

The United Nations says 1998 was the Year of the Ocean, but I beg to differ. I’m fairly convinced that next year will be the year we see world leaders begin to take responsibility for the future of our ocean, and start to turn words into action. We’re also going to see an innovation explosion…

For a Nearly Hundred-foot-long Jellyfish, It’s Christmas All Year

This nearly hundred-foot-long sea creature is all dressed up for the holidays. Just don’t try to pet it. Its body contains thousands of poisoned-filled stinging cells just waiting for a victim to brush past.