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Tag archives for New England

Underwater Filmmaker Faces Off With Sharks

Underwater filmmaker and artist Joe Romeiro saw his first shark when he was five, and he’s been hooked ever since. In a short portrait with extraordinary close-ups of sharks underwater, filmmakers Jon Betz and Matt Weiss capture Joe in action, filming and sketching the predator that has fascinated him since childhood. We asked Jon and Matt to share a bit more about what drew them to this collaboration.

Geography in the News: Maple Syrup Time

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com SUGAR TIME IN NEW ENGLAND Sugar maple are tapped in New England and 2013 may be a better year for the maple syrup industry after several declining years. Maple syrup, that sweet sticky syrup that makes mere pancakes incredibly delicious, is threatened…

Plenty Of Fish In The Sea? It’s The Law!

By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown In the 1990’s many U.S. fisheries found themselves in crisis. The fish they relied on were deeply depleted from decades of getting caught faster than they could reproduce. After years of bitter argument and concerted conservation-group efforts, Congress in 1996 passed a sweeping set of amendments to the federal…

Winter Storm Nemo: Share Your Blizzard Pictures

If you’re braving the blizzard this weekend in New England, send your best photo to National Geographic’s Your Shot.

As Fisheries Service Dithers, New England Porpoises Drown

By Carl Safina and Andrew Read Every twelve hours in the Gulf of Maine, a porpoise swims into a net it cannot see, struggles until it runs out of breath, and drowns. That’s because New England gill-net fishermen simply refuse to use a proven solution that they helped develop, a solution fishermen on the West…

Fish on Fridays: Time for New England’s Groundfishery to Hit the “Reset” Button

The following piece was originally published by the Center for American Progress. At the end of last September, I wrote a column, enthusiastically titled “Optimism for the New England Groundfishery.” My theory was that after a history of overfishing, subsequent belt-tightening, and implementation of a new management system, the industry was on the cusp of…

The Bottom Line: Little Fish, Big Fishery

Within the next few weeks, alewife and blueback herring, collectively known as river herring, will begin their annual migration from coastal waters to their native rivers. The platinum-colored fish spend most of the year in the ocean, migrating to rivers to spawn each spring before returning to sea. River herring were once plentiful in Northeast…

The Bottom Line: An Inconvenient Truth About Gulf of Maine Cod

Jud Crawford, science and policy manager of the Pew Environment Group’s Northeast Fisheries Program, is my guest author today. He is going to provide some important perspectives about the recent scientific assessment of Gulf of Maine cod. Many in New England were recently stunned by the news that the region’s prized codfish are in much deeper trouble than…

Overfishing 101: Dissecting Sectors

Six months ago, I wrote about the historic reforms to New England’s important groundfish fisheries, which target bottom-dwelling species such as cod and flounder that have fed New Englanders for centuries. The New England Fishery Management Council adopted these changes last year to reverse the devastating impact of decades of overfishing. New England groundfish fishermen have operated…

Overfishing 101: New England’s First Year of Fishing Under Sectors

Read the full “Overfishing 101″ series here. Since 1784, a five-foot wooden carving of a cod has hung from the ceiling of the Massachusetts State House—a symbolic reminder of the important place this fish holds in the hearts of New Englanders. Cod, along with other groundfish such as haddock and flounder, has supported coastal towns and economies…