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BioBlitz Comes to San Francisco

Over 300 scientists reported for duty Friday morning, March 28th for a 24-hour species count at San Francisco’s Golden Gate National Parks. The event, known as BioBlitz, brings together local scientists and members of the community to survey a new national park each year. This year, the National Geographic-National Park Service partnership celebrates its 8th…

Geography in the News: Majestic Denali

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Denali National Park and Preserve, A North American Treasure In the fall of 2009, documentary filmmaker Ken Burns’ film The National Parks: America’s Best Idea aired on the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). Burns, whose film topics range from the Civil War to jazz music…

How Do You Define a National Park?

As the group arrives in Nino Konis with little fanfare, questions over defining and understanding National Parks and conservation arise.

On the Eve of Political Upheaval, A National Park is Born

A young explorer travels through Timor-Leste investigating how this new nation is addressing the joint issues of conservation and development. There will be a lot of terrible public transportation.

10 Ways National Geographic Has Changed the World

National Geographic magazine’s 125th anniversary issue is out on newsstands this month. As we take a look back at our legacy so far, here are just a few of the ways that National Geographic has changed the world.

National Geographic and the National Parks: A Brief History

April 22nd through April 28th is National Park Week. It’s a celebration of the more than 400 national parks in the U.S., including canyons, forests, beaches, historic houses and battlefields. While National Geographic can’t take any credit for these spectacular places, we do take pride in our long-standing connection to the national parks, a connection that stretches back all the way to the 1800s – before either the National Geographic Society or the National Park Service even existed.

The Treasures of Tursujuq: one of North America’s largest national parks

With little fanfare, the Inuit people of Nunavik in northern Quebec, the Grand Council of the Cree, and the Government of Quebec announced the creation of Tursujuq National Park—a 6.5 million acre protected area along the eastern shore of Hudson Bay. Not only is this remarkable for its size—it’s the largest protected area in eastern North America and one of the top 10 largest parks on the continent—but perhaps even more incredible is that the park is several million acres larger than it had been expected to be a few years ago.

Adorable Pygmy Chameleon Captured in Stunning Photos

See pictures of a rare pygmy chameleon spotted recently in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique.

Developing an International Conservation Project Around Gran Chaco

Earlier this year Rolex announced the five winners of the 2012 Rolex Awards for Enterprise, who are being honored in New Delhi, India, on November 27. This profile looks at the work of 2012 Laureate Erika Cuéllar, a conservationist who is training local people in three countries to protect South America’s Gran Chaco. “Cuéllar has already proved herself as an inspirational and innovative negotiator who has gained the respect of indigenous people and political leaders alike. Her Rolex Award for Enterprise recognizes these attributes and will support this extension of Cuéllar’s participatory approach to preserving one of South America’s last truly wild places,” Rolex says.

September 16, 2012: Earth’s Earliest Mummies in Peru, Glacial Lakes on Mountaintops, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we dodge cannibals in Indonesia, dodge polar bears while digging up dinosaur bones, educate the country’s future leaders, laugh along with hyenas in South Africa, climb mountains to save people living under glacial lakes, fight over the Ganges’ erosion in India, explore Peru’s national forests for new species, and photograph all of the units of America’s National Park System.

BioBlitz Confirms Four Bat Species in Rocky Mountain National Park

Cay Ogden, retired National Park Service wildlife biologist, discusses the bats that live in Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Park, and why we should do all we can to help bats co-exist with us in urban areas. Ogden’s role in the BioBlitz was to organize two teams of scientists to confirm the seven species of bats…

Goodbye to “Primitive America”: An Interview With Jon Jarvis

National Park Service director Jon Jarvis came to Rocky Mountain National Park this weekend to join in the BioBlitz. But he also came to release a report, prepared at his request by a committee of scientists, that outlines a new strategy for the Park Service as it approaches its centennial in 2016. Called Revisiting Leopold, the report is modeled on a 1963 report drafted by ecologist A. Starker Leopold. The Leopold Report became a lodestar for a generation of ecologically minded rangers, including Jarvis—but Jarvis says it no longer fits the world we live in.

BioBlitz 2012: Get out and Explore!

Rocky Mountain, National Park, Colorado – What is a BioBlitz? At its core a BioBlitz is about connecting with nature. Trained scientists team up with students and the general public—you and me—and explore a place. You take a close look at what’s around you, learn about all the living things that call that place home,…

BioBlitz 2012 at Rocky Mountain National Park

Stay tuned for more updates from this year’s BioBlitz as we continue to bring you coverage from Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.

National Geographic Receives Conservation Award for BioBlitz

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar presents a Partners in Conservation Award to the National Geographic Society today for its work with the National Park Service to increase public understanding and engagement in science and science-based management in the national parks with “The BioBlitz.” BioBlitz is generally a 24-hour event in which teams of…