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Tag archives for National Geographic grants

And the 10,000th National Geographic Grant Goes to…

As of today, the National Geographic Society has issued 10,000 grants funding research and exploration since 1890–including ten National Geographic grant projects that, according to an internal panel, “have made the greatest difference in understanding the Earth.” Barbara Moffet interviews Krithi Karanth, a 32-year-old conservation biologist based in Bangalore, India, the recipient of National Geographic’s 10,000th grant.

Why Nat Geo Exploration Is “Important to us all”

On the occasion of National Geographic making its 10,000th grant for exploration, we interview Peter Raven, chairman of the Committee for Research and Exploration, the Society’s oldest grant-making body. Raven discusses why funding scientific research and exploration has never been more important, especially as the human population has passed the 7,000,000,000 mark, and the planet is pressed hard to meet everyone’s needs.

National Geographic Launches Global Exploration Fund

“There is still so much to explore and discover about our planet,” National Geographic Executive Vice President for Mission Programs, Terry Garcia, said today at the launch of National Geographic’s new Global Exploration Fund. “We are at the beginning of our greatest age of exploration.”

Changing Climate a Hot Topic Among Himalayan Villagers, Study Finds

Warmer temperatures, variable monsoons, and other signs of climate change are a hot topic of conversation among many Himalayan villagers, according to scientific sampling of climate change perception among local peoples.

Kenyan Chainsaw Gang Thwarted

National Geographic Big Cats Initiative grantee Anne Kent Taylor continues her updates from the field in Kenya this weekend. Her adventures this week include a giraffe rescue and an encounter with a chainsaw gang. Taylor has been using funding from the Big Cats Initiative to provide wire fencing to Kenya’s Maasai herders, on the basis…

Monarch Butterflies: Miles to Go Before They Sleep (and Lay Eggs)

Dr. Stephen B. Malcolm, professor at Western Michigan University, has been studying monarch butterflies in the field for 28 years, recently with support from National Geographic’s Committee for Research and Exploration. He can tell you all about the monarchs passing through your garden this spring — and some of their mysterious cousins in South America.

New Hope for a Rare Bird in the Syrian Desert, Explorers Journal

A few years back, Gianluca Serra found a legendary bird thought extinct in Syria, with funds from National Geographic’s Committee for Research and Exploration. Now Serra is trying to forge a stable population of these ungainly creatures, with a little help from a prince and some first ladies. By Barbara Moffet Q: The northern bald…

New Beetle Species, Named for National Geographic, Sheds Light on Island Evolution

By Jesús Gómez-Zurita New Caledonia, an island archipelago east of Australia, has long been recognized as a hotspot for biodiversity, maintaining a rich and mostly endemic flora and fauna, including some emblematic examples of island oddities and living fossils. As is typically the case in the tropics, despite the obvious appeal of New Caledonia for biodiversity studies,…

On the Conservation Frontline in Africa’s Big Cat Country

National Geographic Big Cats Initiative grantee Anne Kent Taylor sent another dispatch from the field in Kenya’s Maasai Mara region. Her account details life among Africa’s wild big cats and the growing conflict between humans and animals competing for the same resources. Anne Kent Taylor’s National Geographic grant supports her work in providing chainlink fencing…

Undiscovered Treasures Are Key Worry of Egyptologist

Willeke Wendrich, professor of Egyptian archaeology and digital humanities at the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at the University of California, Los Angeles, answers questions about the volatile situation in Egypt. She has received three grants from the National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration to investigate agricultural sites from the Neolithic period in Egypt’s…

Hyenas Bounce Off Fence Protecting African Livestock

Anne Kent Taylor continues her reports from the field in Kenya, where she and local collaborators have been providing chainlink fencing to farmers to shield their cattle, goats and other animals from big predators. In the face of “horrific” predation of livestock, the fencing program has been achieving very encouraging results. One farmer reported watching…

Super-Predators Foiled by Kenya Fencing Project

Anne Kent Taylor reports from rural Kenya that her project to help livestock farmers fence their animals at night has put barriers around 200 bomas–and so far there have been no reports of predation in the protected enclosures. The work is supported by the National Geographic Big Cats Initiative, an initiative by the National geographic…

Nat Geo Biologist Named Turkey’s Scientist of the Year

National Geographic grantee Cagan Sekercioglu has been named Scientist of the Year by a consortium of media in Turkey. The honor caps a year of achievement for the biologist, who is both on the faculty at the University of Utah and a doçent, the equivalent of associate professor, in Turkey. Earlier in 2010, Sekercioglu was…

In Search of Nepal’s Missing Tigers

Nepal’s estimated 120 adult wild tigers do not take into account the young mountain landscape in the Churia region, so the country could be home to more big cats than believed. Using a grant from the National Geographic Society/Waitt Institute Program, biologist Kanchan Thapa is currently in the field, setting camera traps and looking for…

Can 2,000 Wild Tigers Find Sanctuary in Thailand Forest?

Thailand’s Western Forest Complex (WEFCOM) is a large protected landscape along the Thailand-Myanmar border of the Tenasserim Range that covers more than 18,000 square kilometers (7,000 square miles), and is one of the largest protected area systems in Southeast Asia. Most WEFCOM habitat has the potential to hold approximately 10 tigers per 100 square kilometers (40…