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Mining in El Salvador: Can Corporate Behaviour be Changed?

Guest article by Vladimir Pacheco Central America remains a land of tremendous potential but persistent poverty. In vulnerable states recovering from civil strife and growing inequality, foreign corporate investment has additional obligations to ensure community consent through patient engagement. In this guest article, Vladimir Pacheco, a social scientist who has worked on mining and human…

February 23, 2014: Cycling to the South Pole, Saving India’s Killer Tigers and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they endure a 750-mile bike ride from Antarctica’s coast to the South Pole, explore the sonic wonders of the world, explain the Yukon’s modern-day gold rush, fly south for the winter with snowy owls, empower Bolivia’s rural citizens to protect their corner of the world, kayak the length of the Colorado and Green Rivers, recover from unpleasant tropical parasites, advocate for tigers and humans when species clash in India, track Turkey’s bears by cellphone.

Afghanistan: Reaching In and Reaching Out

In this guest article, my former student from the University of Vermont, Ian Lynch, narrates his perspectives on Afghanistan’s future based on the past months he has spent in Kabul as a teacher for the School of Leadership (SOLA). Ian exemplifies the best of American youth who are trying to genuinely help rebuild Afghanistan despite…

Massive Copper Mine in the Heart of Lower Zambezi National Park Approved

The battle continues as the Kangaluwi mining project in Zambia’s Lower Zambezi National Park is approved by the Patriotic Front. But at what cost?

Will 2014 Be the Year of the Ocean?

The United Nations says 1998 was the Year of the Ocean, but I beg to differ. I’m fairly convinced that next year will be the year we see world leaders begin to take responsibility for the future of our ocean, and start to turn words into action. We’re also going to see an innovation explosion…

New Interest in Seafloor Mining Revives Calls for Conservation

By Michael W. Lodge New interest in the exploitation of seabed minerals has led to the revival of old concerns for the preservation of our oceans, argues Michael W. Lodge, Deputy to the Secretary-General and Legal Counsel of the  International Seabed Authority, and speaker at the upcoming World Ocean Summit hosted by The Economist in…

Tsodilo: Mining Between 2 World Heritage Sites?

On three occasions between 12th and 15th September 2013, the 2013 Okavango Wetland Bird Survey expedition team witnessed a SPECTREM2000 fixed wing aircraft flying very low over one of the remotest wilderness areas in southern Africa with magnetometers and sensors deployed. This aircraft was over 100 kilometres from the iron ore formation being explored by Tsodilo Resources Limited between Shakawe…

Chile and Pakistan: A Missed Opportunity for Mineral Relations at Reko Diq

Looking at a planetary map, one would find very little in common between South America’s most developed country, Chile, and South Asia’s beleaguered nuclear power, Pakistan. Apart from the physical distance, there is little commonality in linguistic, religious or ethno-cultural background. Yet minerals and economic expedience have brought these two countries closer to possible cooperation.…

Employment and Indigenous Empowerment in Mining: Australia and South Africa

I recently supervised the Master’s degree thesis project of Richard W Roeder, a German lawyer and Rotary Peace Studies Scholar at the University of Queensland who sought to ask the following research question:  “How do Public Governance and Private Governance regarding the employment of Indigenous Australians / Historically Disadvantaged South Africans in the mining sector…

Race for Rare Earths in Central Asia

Guest article by Sebastien Peyrouse In this guest article, Dr. Sebastien Peyrouse of George Washington University provides an overview of key developments in rare earth minerals development projects in Central Asia. Dr. Peyrouse participated in the inaugural event of the Rare Earths Research Consortium, at the University of Queensland. Whereas China has decided to reduce…

Haiti’s Mineral Fortune: Deliverance from Destitution?

Haiti — the poorest country in the Western hemisphere has been struck by natural misfortunes and malevolent foreign intervention for decades. As the first independent nation to emerge from resettled African slaves in 1804, Haiti held much promise at its inception. Yet the nascent Haitian state was beset by marginalization from its neighbors, particularly the…

The Hot, Powerful Water Beneath Glasgow

The city of Glasgow sits above old caverns filled with hot water. Could it be used to heat homes?

Armenia’s Mining Quandary: Developing a Diaspora-linked Economy

Armenia’s Resource Routes from Saleem H Ali on Vimeo. Among the various states that emerged from the demise of the Soviet Union, Armenia had the most well-established diaspora. Owing to a history of marginalization and oppression from various neighboring  powers, particularly in the earlier part of the twentieth century, Armenians fled their ethnic homeland in…

Reconciling with Rare Earths in Malaysia

Guest article by Bernadetta Devi “Rare Earths” are a group of 17 elements that are currently used in a wide array of modern technologies, ranging from hard disk drives to lamp phosphors to hybrid car batteries. At present 90% of these minerals are mined in China due to a range of economic and environmental factors.…

The Climate Challenger Voyage: The Journey Begins

The Climate Challenger Voyage is a community initiative inspired by The Nature Conservancy‘s Manuai Matawai, who dreamed of building a traditional long voyage canoe and sailing around the Pacific to connect communities grappling with climate change through culture and conservation. Two years later, Manuai and nine other crew members—members of the Titan tribe of Papua New Guinea—are…