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Following Nemo: Clownfish Make Epic Ocean Journeys

Turns out finding Nemo could take a while—a new study reveals for the first time that baby clownfish travel up to 250 miles in search of a new reef.

Recognizing World Fish Migration Day in the Amazon’s Waters

The Amazon basin—with its vast rainforests and river systems—is the most bio-diverse place on earth and, not surprisingly, a region rich in discovery. Newly described plant and animal species are a frequent occurrence. The recent video documentation of a newly discovered fish migration is a much rarer event and particularly noteworthy this weekend as we celebrate World Fish Migration Day, a one-day global initiative to boost awareness of the importance of open rivers and migratory fish.

Geography in the News: Polio Returns with Tenacity

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Polio’s Tenacity a Constant Battle Just as the eradication of the crippling polio disease seemed within reach, it is advancing again and new questions are rising. Ignorance of science and medicine by the general public, migration from war-torn regions and possibly a new strain…

Monarch Butterflies Shrink, Get Paler After Skipping a Meal

Brilliantly colored monarch butterflies literally are what they eat—and missing even one meal can be harmful, a new study says.

US/Mexico Border Stories Through Kids’ Eyes

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jason de León is on a mission: Take 30 kids from the Arivaca community in southern Arizona and team them up with National Geographic photographers to tell the story of life on the US/Mexico border.

Path of the Pronghorn — Leading to New Passages: Part 3

For more than a decade, scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society have conducted research and worked with partners to protect pronghorn migration to and from Grand Teton National Park along a more than 100-mile long migration corridor known as the Path of the Pronghorn. The animals migrate along this corridor between summer range in and around Grand Teton National Park and winter range in the Upper Green River Valley south of Trapper’s Point in western Wyoming. If this migration corridor is severed, pronghorn will be lost from Grand Teton National Park.

Worst Weather Ever: Has It Become a Cliché Yet?

The troubles of Poyang Lake, China’s largest freshwater lake, are getting drowned out by the clamor generated by the superstorms Typhoon Haiyan and Cyclone Phailin. A crisis is still a crisis, however, even if it is not punctuated by 150mph winds and catastrophic flooding. Poyang’s water levels ebb and flow according to the season. In…

Geography in the News: Roma Problems

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Europe’s Roma In late July 2010, French President Nicolas Sarkozy expelled thousands of Roma people from France. The move was widely criticized by the European Union (EU), as the move deliberately targeted one particular ethnic minority for deportation. More recently, according to Time (Nov.…

Migration by Any Means Necessary

The airplane passenger of the month for October was an unusual breed of traveler, one who gratefully received first-class airfare even though the ticket sent him more than 2,000 km out of his way. He was trying to head south for the winter, got lost along the way, and has ended up with winter accommodations near…

Europe’s Early Settlers Uncovered

Europe’s Stone Age settlers migrated in waves that replaced older hunter-gatherer cultures, suggests a study that looks at European DNA, both ancient and modern. The results reported in the journal, Science, answer questions about the peopling of modern-day Europe. Some of our ancestors hunted wild animals and gathered plants to survive, while others were discovering agriculture, and…

The Sad Ballad of Menes, the Egyptian #Spyduck

Menes wasn’t a spy, and neither was he a duck. Thanks to a combination of xenophobic paranoia and spotty Arabic-to-English translation, this one-year-old White Stork was unfairly painted as both and clapped into jail.

Days later he was exonerated, released, and eaten.

The Mystery of the Migrating Fishes: Northern Adventures in the Great Lakes

Dr. Solomon David, Postdoctoral Research Associate Daniel P. Haerther Center for Conservation & Research, Shedd Aquarium Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin-Madison I had received word from colleagues that northern pike (Esox lucius), an apex predator in freshwaters throughout the northern hemisphere, had begun migrating inland from Lake Michigan, and I had come to track…

The Mystery of the Migrating Fishes: Investigating Clues for Great Lakes Conservation Efforts

The Great Lakes are the largest supply of freshwater in the world, and more than 36 million people depend on them for drinking water. As a result, monitoring and maintaining the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem is an urgent priority. Of the diverse organisms inhabiting freshwater systems, fishes are familiar to scientists and laypeople…

December 23, 2012: Whispering Dogs’ Secrets, Saving Cheetahs with Donkeys, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we whisper dogs’ secrets to their owners, trade guns for climbing gear in Rio, paint endangered animals onto a barn, teach donkeys to protect cows from cheetahs in Namibia, save the world from a Mayan apocalypse, tunnel deep under Gaza to deliver groceries, sacrifice our fingertips to bee stings in Turkey, and take in hot air from shale rock across the United States.

Wolf Pack on Todagin Mountain

Over 2011 and 2012, Paul Colangelo camped on Todagin Mountain with its large herd of endangered Stone’s Sheep for five months to tell the story of the herd and document its habitat use, using specialized camera equipment to record the movements of the sheep across the plateau. Learn more in his earlier posts: Surviving Todagin.…