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October 20, 2013: Paddling and Kite Surfing East Africa, Reenacting Civil War Battles and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we paddle board and kite surf in East Africa before meeting disaster, reenact the Civil War’s second bloodiest battle, motorcycle through the Middle East while searching for enlightenment, and combine rock & roll with genetics while trying to save humanity from infectious disease.

How What Happens in Syria Could Affect Your Travel Plans

Airlines are preparing emergency routes in the event of military activity in the Middle East this fall. Here’s what that could mean for your travel plans.

Political Currents of Water Management: Challenges in Israel, Palestine, and Jordan

Posted by Kate Voss, UCCHM Water Policy Fellow. This is the fourth in a series of posts on our Water Diplomacy trip to Israel, Jordan, and Palestine inspired by our paper on ‘Groundwater Depletion in the Middle East.’ Other posts in the series: 1) Middle East Lost a Dead Sea Amount of Water in 7…

Geography in the News: Guantanamo

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com Guantanamo’s Troubles The U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was selected by President George W. Bush’s administration to house some of the worst of Osamma bin Laden’s al-Queda terrorists and their Taliban supporters from Afghanistan. It is one of the few…

Geography in the News: The Caucasus’ Storied Cultural Geography

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com CHECHNYA AND THE CAUCASUS REGION Among the world’s longest-lived hotspots is the Caucasus region, rivaling only the Balkans as a volatile kettle of violent and rebellious ethnic cultures. Attention is now focused on Chechnya and the Caucasus region because of the ethnicity…

Geography in the News: Golan Heights

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com GOLAN HEIGHTS AND THE DMZ In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since…

Desalinating Holy Waters with the Red Sea-Dead Sea Conveyance

  Posted from Tel Aviv by Sasha Richey, UCCHM Graduate Fellow. This is the third in a series of posts on our Water Diplomacy trip to Israel, Jordan and Palestine.  Other posts in the series: 1) Middle East Lost a Dead Sea Amount of Water in 7 Years, by Jay Famiglietti ; and 2) Parallel…

Parallel Worlds: Water Management in Israel and California

Posted from Jerusalem by Kate Voss, UCCHM Water Policy Fellow. This is the second in a series of posts on our Water Diplomacy trip to Israel, Jordan and Palestine.  Other posts in the series: 1) Middle East Lost a Dead Sea Amount of Water in 7 Years, by Jay Famiglietti ; and 3) Desalinating Holy…

The Middle East Lost a Dead Sea-Size Amount of Water in 7 Years

Posted from Amman, Jordan.  This is the first in a series of posts on our water diplomacy trip to Israel, Jordan and Palestine.  Other posts in the series: 2) Parallel Worlds:  Water Management in Israel and California, by UCCHM Policy Fellow Kate Voss; 3) Desalinating Holy Waters with the Red Sea – Dead Sea Conveyance,…

October 28, 2012: Love in the Northwest Passage, Giant Predators in Prehistoric Australia, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we sail a wooden yacht through the frozen Northwest Passage, dine with vultures in Turkey, discover life in an undersea desert in Gabon, remember the 18 fallen tigers in last year’s Zanesville, Ohio tragedy, dodge tree crocodiles and carnivorous kangaroos in prehistoric Australia, feed some birds and try not to get killed, paddle down Alaska’s Tanana River, and save macaws by making traditional headdresses (with synthetic feathers).

Jordan’s Green Hotels

Jordan’s first and only “true ecolodge” tries to leave a minimal footprint on its desert ecosystem, while a visionary hotelier has won international accolades for making his company’s five Jordanian resorts and hotels models of sustainability. These are two examples of how the Middle East country is trying to make its tourism industry friendly to the environment.

Jordan Celebrates 2012, Special Year for Guests

Arab Spring and the global financial crisis delivered a double whammy to tourism in the Middle East. The Arab world lost more than U.S.$7 billion in tourism revenue as a result of 2011′s upheaval, according to Bandar bin Fahd Al Fahed, the chairman of the Arab Tourism Organization. (Reported by Ahram Online, September 30, 2011.)…

Riding the Wave in Libya: A War Correspondent’s Experience

FOX News’ veteran reporter and war correspondent, Steve Harrigan, is currently reporting from Tripoli, Libya as the rebels gain control and Qaddafi’s regime collapses. Harrigan has endured the elements while in Libya — sleeping on the ground, facing pro-Qaddafi forces with guns, navigating the rebel crowds, getting news from locals, seeking shelter amidst the fighting — all the while reporting live on FOX News. He found a moment to answer some questions about his experience.

Ancient “Desert Kites” Funneled Gazelles into Killing Pits, Study Finds

As long as 6,000 years ago the people of the Middle East were using a system of stone structures to funnel thousands of migrating gazelles and other animals into traps where they could be killed and butchered, a new study has determined. “Humans may have driven a species of gazelle to the brink of extinction…

Soundtrack for the Arab Uprising

Arab hip-hop, once relegated to the sidelines, has emerged as the soundtrack of the resistance.