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Monarch Butterflies Shrink, Get Paler After Skipping a Meal

Brilliantly colored monarch butterflies literally are what they eat—and missing even one meal can be harmful, a new study says.

Update From Colorado River Delta: A Community Gets its River Back

For more than two weeks, the Colorado River has been flowing in its delta, through more than 30 miles (48 kilometers) of recently bone-dry river channel choked with desert scrub.  The flow is all too brief, lasting only eight weeks in all.  The United States and Mexico are demonstrating how a “pulse flow” of water…

Chasing the Historic “Pulse Flow” Through the Colorado River Delta

For one week now, the Colorado River has been flowing into its delta.  It’s the first ever deliberate release of water here to benefit the environment. That the river is flowing again in its delta is somewhat astounding, all the more remarkable because it’s happening as the result of cooperation between the United States and…

The U.S. and Mexico Partner to Save the Colorado River Delta

Since 1960, the Colorado River has not flowed regularly to the sea. While pockets of green remain, the Colorado in its delta is a parched river begging for relief. The dry, sandy channel glares in the bright sun, abandoned by the river that has been overtapped and overworked for too long. It’s hard not to think of the…

On the Trail of the Pygmy Raccoon

by Kevin Schafer / iLCP No, this is not your average raccoon.  And that, precisely, is the point of this story.  For one of the world’s most endangered carnivores has had the misfortune of looking like a common neighborhood pest – the raccoon. But the Pygmy Raccoon of Mexico’s Cozumel Island is not at all…

Mexico is Saving Sharks While Australia Kills Them

There was great news out of Mexico this week when the Mexican government announced a permanent ban on fishing for great white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias). The measure applies to national waters on both coasts and is notable because it means that white sharks caught accidentally – bycatch – by commercial or recreational fishermen must be…

January 26, 2014: Riding Rio Roosevelt’s Rapids, Sliding Headfirst at 90 MPH and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson and his guests as they paddle Class V rapids on the River of Doubt, hand cycle the length of the Americas, investigate deaths from common drugs, preserve lions’ disappearing prides, slide headfirst down an icy track at 90 miles per hour, and reconcile the future and the past in the Amazon Rainforest.

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell Honors U.S.-Mexico Colorado River Agreement

Sally Jewell, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Interior, took time today to recognize the heroic efforts of U.S. and Mexican citizens who spent years together negotiating a new Colorado River agreement between the two nations.  Jewell noted that “ecosystems know no borders” and acknowledged the importance of cooperation when addressing the challenge of caring…

Fly Baja and See Why Baja

Escape the polar vortex and go Doors Off Over Baja California

Eradication Success Rapidly Confirmed

Completely eradicating pests from an island is a major conservation achievement, such as the recently announced eradication of goats from 15,380 ha Aldabra atoll. However, reliably confirming the absence of a species is difficult, bringing to mind the famous mantra ‘absence of evidence is not evidence of absence’. So how do eradication managers finally confirm…

November 24, 2013: Hanging From Antarctic Cliffs, Living With Wolves and More

This week, we live for days hanging from an Antarctic cliff in high winds, then we join a Mexican circus, live with wolves for six years, and crush six tons of ivory.

November 17, 2013: Horse-Riding Across Asia, Roadtripping America With a Canine Copilot and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson, as we ride 6,000 miles across Central Asia, collect chicken feces to protect bees from wasps, cycle across Iceland, ponder the moose’s plight, and drive to every state with a canine copilot.

SmartFish: Catching Gold in the Fish Market

By Amanda Nagai The Japanese fisherman caught a goliath grouper and began to cry. That was when Hoyt Peckham knew things had to change. Peckham had been in the fishing industry for decades, fishing and advising fishing communities in Maine, the Caribbean, Mexico, Polynesia, and Southeast Asia. He had organized exchanges among Japanese, Hawaiian, and…

Whale Whisperer Don Pachico Mayoral is Gone

Don Pachico Mayoral, the first man to make physical contact and develop friendly relationships with some of the gray whales of Baja, Mexico, is gone.  A stroke took him on Tuesday, October 22, 2013. He was 72.  I met Don Pachico on the shore of San Ignacio Lagoon a couple of years ago while filming…

The Missing Colorado River Delta: Rivers, Borders, and Maps

Water flows downhill, and you wouldn’t think that rivers would stop for political boundaries, not even when national borders intersect a river channel’s natural course.  The Mekong flows through China, Laos, Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, and Cambodia before it drains into the South China Sea.  The Nile watershed includes Ethiopia, Uganda, South Sudan, Sudan, and Egypt,…