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Through the Eyes of the Locals

Lost in the middle of a storm, Sadia and Andrew trek up the mountains to find a remote village in authentic Laos.

When I Grow Up: A Day With Our Next-Generation Monks

Lost in the adventures of the mountainous terrain in Laos, we are guided by an unexpected group of new friends with a unique, traditional upbringing.

A Hives Outbreak and Nothing Left to Lose

A hives outbreak causes a Young Explorer to use both traditional herbal remedies and Western medicine to treat her symptoms. Find out which was the winner…

Teen Pharmacist: An Unregulated Distribution of Drugs

After several injuries from a motorcycle accident, Sadia Ali ventures to a remote pharmacy to get medication. Her experience is an outstanding illustration of the pharmaceutical conditions in Laos.

A Healer’s Meridian: Where Eastern and Western Healing Intersect

When the conveniences of Western healthcare are removed, how do you treat an illness? “A Healer’s Meridian” explores the power of healing in Laos, where Eastern traditions intersect with Western treatment.

Geography in the News: Ebola Terror

By Neal Lineback, Baker Perry and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Ebola Virus Spreads to West Africa Dangerous viral hemorrhagic diseases, particularly including the deadly Ebola, are emerging as threats to humans around the world. The deadly disease Ebola has been the focus of intense news coverage since the publication of the book,…

February 15, 2014: California’s Drought, Inside the Human Brain, a 1,000 Mile Desert Trek and More

Join radio host Boyd Matson every week for adventure, conservation and green science. This week they are trekking 1,000 miles through the Empty Quarter Desert, searching for the lost civilization of Shangri La, looking at the implications of California’s severe drought, walking through Chinatowns, researching the human brain, getting a visit from the Love Doctor, and learning what makes Russians smile.

Synthetic Chemical From Bears Could Stall Onset of Diabetes

A synthetic chemical similar to bear bile—the bitter, yellow-green liquid drained from bear gallbladders and certain livestock—may one day help treat diabetes in people.

Your Suggestions for Urine—Please Don’t Try This at Home

Can urine really treat jellyfish stings? See our readers’ wacky suggestions for urine—and why many aren’t a good idea.

Tadpole Sees Through Eyeball on Its Tail

Tadpoles bred with eyes surgically implanted in their tails still see—a novel discovery that could help the blind, a new study says.

Does This Look Infected? Medical Procedures Then and Now

By Kevin Fletcher So many things have changed in medicine over the past few centuries. Procedures that used to take hours of grueling, grotesque labor can now be done in just a matter of minutes and are dramatically less painful or almost completely pain free. In simpler times, when bullets had to be extracted and…

Touring the Hospital of Tomorrow

From: Top Masters in Healthcare (Click the image above for a larger version) Hospitals in the developed world rely on increasingly advanced technology, which is helping practitioners to treat a wide range of maladies and extend our lives. Of course, technology is often a double-bladed sword. New genetics tests can help screen for metabolic disorders that…

Do We Really Need to use Human Medicine on Farm Animals?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) took action on Wednesday, January 4 to ban certain uses of one class of drugs, cephalosporins, in raising cattle, pigs, chickens, and turkeys. Cephalosporin drugs are used to treat pneumonia, urinary tract infections, gastro-intestinal diseases, and other life-threatening infections in people; the FDA’s action will help preserve the…

Distractibility May Be Caused By Excess Grey Matter

Being called a brainiac may be a compliment but when it comes to gray matter, a person can have too much of a good thing.

Building a Health Care Network in a Ravaged Land

As a boy 20 years ago, PopTech Social Innovation Fellow Rajesh Panjabi fled civil war in Liberia with his family. Now he’s back, helping create a community health care network to serve a ravaged country. By Ford Cochran National Geographic is on Maine’s Atlantic coast for the 2010 PopTech Conference, which will be webcast live…