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Text Message Saves Trapped Whale Shark

A text message saves a young whale shark that got tangled in a fishing net off the coast of Indonesia in the Java sea.

Giant Deep-Sea Oarfish Found off California Coast

Updated on October 16, 2013 at 11 am. A deep-sea creature that is rarely seen, and was likely the inspiration for sea serpent tales among mariners of yore, has resurfaced. On Sunday, staff of the Catalina Island Marine Institute (CIMI) found the body of a dead 18-foot (5.5-meter) long oarfish in Toyon Bay on California’s…

Search & Deploy! Building Trust Through Collaborative Marine Research

By Holly Rindge, California Ocean Science Trust As we sail out of Moss Landing Harbor, there are no familiar sounds of sea lions or crashing waves.  The early morning fog seems to have muted even the seabirds.   The swells are small today, but that is little comfort to my queasy stomach. I’m onboard the F/V Donna…

Gyre Expedition Probes Impact of Plastic Pollution on Remote Beaches

Earlier this summer, a team of scientists and artists set out along coastal Alaska, to document the impact that plastic pollution is having on remote beaches. The project, called the Gyre Expedition, was launched by the Alaska SeaLife Center and the Anchorage Museum. The goal is multimedia reportage and art that will be showcased in Anchorage,…

The Photographic Chain: Five minutes with Philip Plisson

This post is the latest in Kike Calvo´s series The Photographic Chain, which profiles photographers from around the world he meets during his travels. My dream is… Dreams change over the years; Now I dream that one of my grandsons discovers an eye and starts the photographic adventure.   The biggest lesson in my career… To…

iLCP Photo Expedition to Document Cradle of Marine Biodiversity

“Long term and meaningful conservation success really is only possible if NGOs and photographers work together – very often also working with scientists. If you can get those three sectors working together, you’re pretty much a non-stoppable force.” Thomas Peschak, Conservation Photographer and iLCP Fellow The International League of Conservation Photographers has pulled together an…

A Key tool for Saving our Oceans

Over the past 20 years, scientists have been assembling compelling data that show the world’s oceans are in deep trouble. Once-abundant species are disappearing, habitats are being destroyed, and fisheries are collapsing across the globe (Jackson et al. 2001, Lotze et al. 2006). For example, studies estimate that biomass of tunas and billfish have decreased…

Salas y Gómez Expedition: An Exceptional Mission

Comandante Andres Rodrigo, commanding officer of the Comandante Toro, shares his thoughts on the Chilean Navy’s first patrol of the new marine park surrounding Salas y Gómez and on hosting a civilian expedition team aboard his ship. Chilean Navy Comandante Andres Rodrigo scans monitors on the bridge of the OPV Comandante Toro. By Ford Cochran…

Salas y Gómez Expedition: Locating an Island Via Satellite

Marine ecologists use a new satellite image of Salas y Gómez and existing imagery of Easter Island to plan their dives and plot their data–and to correct long-standing cartographic errors in the placement of the former island. Alan Friedlander imports a high-resolution satellite image of Salas y Gómez into the GIS on his laptop and…

Salas y Gómez Expedition: Enric Sala Answers Your Questions

Marine ecologist and National Geographic Fellow Enric Sala takes a break from diving around Salas y Gómez Island to answer your questions. Are you guys taking necessary precautions so as not to affect the marine life in any way? Yes absolutely. Our objective is to study the natural behavior of marine life, so we do…

Salas y Gómez Expedition: Marine Protection for Rapa Nui

Oceana’s Alex Muñoz Wilson and National Geographic’s Enric Sala met this afternoon with Rapa Nui community representatives on Easter Island to discuss their ambition to create a marine protected area off the island’s only town, Hanga Roa. In time, such a park might restore some of the abundance recalled by long-time Easter Island residents and…

Salas y Gómez Expedition: Last Day in the Marine Park

Today was our last day at Salas y Gómez before returning to Easter Island. We have spent only six days at this little island but already it feels like home. We first dived here wondering what its underwater world was like; now we leave feeling part of it. A rainbow greets the dive team at…

Salas y Gómez Expedition: To Motu Motira Hiva

For days, we’ve dived around Salas y Gómez and stood on deck, staring at its rocky, surf-swept contours. Much as we wanted to explore it above the waterline, a landing looked reckless, if not impossible. Michel Garcia had done it before, years ago, and thought it could be done again. He found a way. The…

Salas y Gómez Expedition: How to Tag a Shark

Colleagues and marine biologists Alan Friedlander and Jim Beets of the University of Hawaii have brought satellite tags to track the wanderings of Salas y Gómez’s Galapagos sharks. Before they can tag them, they have to catch them, a days-long undertaking that requires teamwork, experience, patience, chum, quick reflexes–and a little luck. (Kids, don’t try…

Salas y Gómez: The Need for Protection

The Salas y Gómez expedition team awoke this morning to find a commercial fishing boat with lines in the water in sight of the Chilean Navy’s patrol ship–no more than a mile or two from the island and well within the marine park’s no-take zone. Chilean sailors boarded the boat and found illegally caught yellowfin…