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The Greater London National Park* Opens

“There is this idea that a National Park has to be remote and rural, but cities are incredibly important habitats too.” Daniel Raven-Ellison describes his project to change the way people look at cities.

Google Street View Reveals Grand Canyon

You’ve used Google’s Street View to navigate unfamiliar cities. Now, you can use it to explore a river. Today, Google, in partnership with American Rivers, is launching the Colorado River Street View. The imagery features the iconic Grand Canyon — 286 miles of the river, from Lee’s Ferry to Pearce Ferry. It marks the first…

2013 — A Cartographic Recap

It’s that time of year—a time to reflect on how our world has changed over the past 365 days. There are many ways to gauge such changes, but none more tangible than comparing National Geographic maps published in 2012 to those published this year. Changes have been many: from the renaming of the west African…

Two Young Explorers Create First Map of the Future Patagonia National Park

For Young Explorers Marty Schnure and Ross Donihue, the past nine months have been a journey of energy, frustration, sweat, cold, wind, laughs, scree, sore feet, an icy tent, warm sleeping bags, a lot of lamb stew, hard work, failure, perseverance, and success.

An Explorer’s Top 5 iPhone Apps for Adventure

National Geographic Young Explorer Jay Simpson shares his Top 5 iPhone Apps for Adventure— what are yours?

Hike Like A Pro: Avoid Hiking Woes With Tips From Andrew Skurka

The sweltering summer is loosening its grip and pretty soon we’ll be welcoming fall’s foliage. It’s an ideal time to take a hike, but whether you’re a hiking aficionado that ventures out for long distances, or a novice that wants to take a day trip, it’s important to prepare. National Geographic Weekend spoke with hiking…

Guests Across The Globe: Six Months of 2013 NG Weekend Interviews

We’re halfway through the year and what better way to map our progress than to, well, map the many guests we’ve had on National Geographic Weekend since the ball dropped back in January?

Top 10 Headlines Today: Fake Rain Created, Summer Solstice Begins…

The top stories on National Geographic’s radar today: Indonesia has deployed synthetic rain to combat potentially life-threatening smog, today marks the beginning of the summer solstice, and…

New Orleans BioBlitz, 18th-Century Edition

Three thousand people explored the Louisiana swamps during BioBlitz last weekend, but an exhibit in town reveals the deep roots of the naturalist tradition in New Orleans.

Escape From Vietnam

On April 30, 1975, the Vietnam War officially ended with the fall of Saigon to Communist forces. Many Vietnamese fled their country, including one Special Forces officer who painstakingly planned his escape and paid $200 on the black market for a copy of a March 1971 National Geographic map to guide him.

Young Explorer Begins Expedition to Map Patagonia National Park

Join Marty Schnure and Ross Donihue as they embark on a cartographic expedition to create a map-based visual portal for exploring the Patagonia National Park Project.

What’s Going on in the Amazon?

An interactive map, launched at Rio+20, seeks to help people keep up-to-date on the state of the Amazon basin.

Where scale permits

As is frequently the case, National Geographic mapmakers―for that matter, mapmakers worldwide―often face the problem of having to fit too much cartographic information into too little cartographic space. Scale, which defines the mathematical relationship between linear measurement on a map to that on the Earth’s surface, ultimately determines how much information can be portrayed on…

Where is Challenger Deep?

James Cameron’s recent voyage to the bottom of the sea made headlines worldwide. As well it should have–Cameron is the first person to venture alone to the deepest known part of the world’s oceans. His “vertical torpedo” submersible dove nearly 11,000 meters to a place he described as “lunar” and “desolate”–a place often called Challenger…

“A country once know as ……”

  Over the past several days the media has been reporting on U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s trip to Myanmar. Some have prefaced their reports using the following verbiage: “Myanmar, a country once know as Burma ……” In 1989 the largest nation on the Southeast Asian mainland changed its name from Burma to Myanmar―a…