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Tag archives for Madagascar

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (Mostly Madagascar!)

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Here she explores the incredible Ankarana Preserve, as well as theories on species distribution and evolution.

Science on the Edge of the World: Tales From Madagascar’s Sakalava Menabe

Cara Brook is a disease ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. Her work is well underway, and it involves a lot more than just tagging and indexing bats.

Back on the Far Side of the World…

Cara Brooke is a Disease Ecologist from the Andrew Dobson Lab at Princeton, studying diseases that can leap from bats to humans. She has just returned to Madagascar a second time and is preparing for another year of fieldwork.

Defending Madagascar’s Frogs From Invading Fungus

By Jonathan Kolby It all started as an idea one afternoon seven years ago.  Having recently learned about the devastating amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd) that was spreading globally and causing irreparable damage to the world’s amphibian biodiversity, I felt there must be something more I could personally do to help save the…

Shark Fishers in Madagascar Sell Fins for Pennies

As a proud new contributor to the Ocean Views blog, I’ll be bringing you stories from myself and my colleagues at Blue Ventures about marine conservation in Madagascar and Belize. This first one comes from Garth Cripps, a senior conservation scientist with Blue Ventures in Madagascar. Here Garth tells us about a series of encounters…

February 2, 2014: Walking from Siberia to Australia, Prepping Putin’s $51 Billion Bash and More

This week, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they walk from Siberia to Australia, celebrate Putin’s $51 billion Olympic bash, get to the historic bottom of Groundhog Day, cycle 11,000 miles from Norway to South Africa, spend 200 days in a year deep inside of caves, dodge the bubonic plague in Madagascar, and search for the last of Africa’s glaciers.

NG Young Explorer Behind the Scenes: The Good, the Bad, and the Unforgettable

National Geographic Young Explorers Grantee Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of…

Fieldwork – Or How To Still Explore The World À La Indiana Jones

National Geographic Young Explorer Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of opportunity,…

Severe Erosion Reveals Earth’s Treasures

National Geographic Young Explorer Alizé Carrère is researching an innovative method of agricultural adaptation in the Malagasy highlands that has emerged in the face of severe deforestation. Known to locals as “lavaka”, literally meaning “hole”, they are massive erosional gullies that provide surprising agricultural and socio-economic benefits, turning a deforested landscape into one of opportunity,…

A Christmas of the Coastal Kind

What made this Christmas so special wasn’t at all a particular tradition or exotic celebration of any notable kind. Instead, it was simply a continuation of business-as-usual, another day in a life where the sea gives only to the extent that one shows up. So on this year’s Christmas day, everyone showed up as they did yesterday, as they will tomorrow, and as they will for every other day of the year.

Another Farewell to Madagascar

The summer rains are setting in on the Eighth Continent, the holiday season is beckoning back home in America, and it is goodbye again from Madagascar.

High Moon Over the Amazon: The Quest for the Monkeys of the Night

In “High Moon Over the Amazon”, a book about the dawn of her career as one of the world’s most distinguished primatologists, Patricia Chapple Wright recounts her pioneering research to study wild nocturnal monkeys in the Peruvian Amazon. It’s a page-turner of a yarn, in which Wright recalls stumbling around in total darkness, trying to follow the owl monkeys (Aotus) moving through the trees high in the canopy above her. The story is not only about how she came to discover the secrets of the world’s only night monkeys, but also the terrors of working in the jungle, including a face-to-face encounter with a jaguar, evading a large snake dangling from branches above her, and watching helplessly as a swarm of army ants swept into her encampment’s provision stores to devour supplies meant to support the scientists for months.

Giving Back to Madagascar

A Young Explorer marvels at how wonderful it feels to be doing something meaningful—for science, for conservation, and for people, too.

Gifts and Politics in Madagascar’s Capital City

Young Explorer Cara Brook takes up residence in Madagascar’s capital city right after the nation holds its first elections since the 2009 political coup.

The Bitter And The Sweet: Finding Opportunity in the Life Cycle of Erosion

Young Explorer Alizé Carrère searches for a silver lining in what might otherwise be a tale of irreversible hardship.