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Lionfish Flare Their Fins to Hunt Together

A new study finds that lionfish—those venomous, striped invaders of reefs in the Caribbean and off of Florida—fan their fins to gather a posse while hunting prey.

International Island Biodiversity Day

The 22nd of May is the International day for Biological Diversity, and this year the theme is Island Biodiversity. Islands house a disproportionate amount of the world’s biodiversity: although less than 5% of the world’s land area, they are home to over 20% of the planet’s terrestrial biodiversity, and in the last 500 years 80%…

Albino Kingsnake and 6 Other Invaders Wreaking Havoc

The albino kingsnake invading the Canary Islands is among many foreign species that have wreaked havoc on their new environments.

San Francisco’s Parks Scoured in Wildlife Inventory

One soggy Saturday morning in March, six kids and their parents stared into the San Francisco Bay looking for “Mussels, Mollusks and More!” Smithsonian Marine Biologist Linda McCann was on hand to help make sense of it all. “Anybody here know what those are?” McCann asks her rapt audience. “We have a lot of barnacles,…

Overfishing Remains Biggest Threat to Mediterranean, Study Confirms

Marine Ecologist Enric Sala says a new study produced by a dozen researchers confirms that the Mediterranean is on a trajectory to become a sea dominated by small tropical species that no one likes to eat. “Fishes will not be abundant, and the native species that the Greeks and Romans started to fish commercially will be rare — and most fisheries and the jobs they support will collapse,” he says. But this could change “if we stop all the irrational overfishing,” Sala adds, “including both legal and illegal fishing, and protect a large chunk of the Mediterranean. Without these radical changes, we’re just going to reduce the Mediterranean Sea to a soup of microbes and jellyfish.”

Invasive Pythons Can Find Home 20 Miles Away, Study Says

For Burmese pythons, there’s no place like home—abd the snakes can navigate from over 20 miles away to get there, a new study says.

January 19, 2014: Waging War Against Whalers, Paragliding Above Pakistan and More

Join host Boyd Matson as he and his guests sleep high on sheer mountain cliffs, wage war against whalers, consume bacteria in pursuit of better health, crash during paragliding takeoff in Pakistan, eat invasive species, and photograph 30 years of warfare in Afghanistan.

Alien Cockroach Species Invading the U.S.

New York City, home to eight million people and untold numbers of cockroaches, just got a few more of the latter. A newly seen species, Periplaneta japonica, has just been discovered in New York’s elevated High Line park. As its name implies, the cockroach is native to Japan, and this is the first time it’s been…

Praying Mantises Falling Victim to Sex Cannibal

New Zealand’s male mantises have developed a fatal attraction for a cannibal invader whose females devour its mates after sex, scientists report.

Geography in the News: Asian Carp

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Invasive Asian Carp An aggressive invasive species—the Asian carp—is threatening the Great Lakes. Able to consume one-third of its body weight in a day, the carp can grow up to five feet (152 cm) long. It also reproduces very quickly. Its presence may spell…

Asian Carp Reproducing Naturally in Great Lakes Tributary

Scientists have confirmed for the first time that a species of the dreaded Asian carp has reproduced naturally in a Great Lakes tributary. While not the variety of Asian carp experts fear will do the most harm in the Great Lakes region, the results have important implications for those concerned about the spread of this…

A River Recovering: Australia’s Upper Snowy River

By Kelvin Montagu You could hear the roar. It reverberated between the soaring ridges of the Byadbo Wilderness in Australia’s Kosciusko National Park. The sound of nature’s raw power as sixty thousand tonnes of water each hour crashed down the Snowy Falls. It was a sound few had heard in the last forty years as…

Invasive Lady Beetle Kills Off Competition Using Parasites

Invasive Asian lady beetle kills off its competition with the help of a fungal parasite.

The Return of Grand Cayman’s Blue Iguana: From Near-Extinction to Endangered

In 2002, between 10-25 blue iguanas remained in the wild. Today, there are 750. By incubating eggs in his home office and gathering plants to feed the baby blues, Fred Burton and his team have brought back a species that was nearly extinct. While these 5-foot-long majestic creatures are still a rare sight, they are…

The Thames: One of the World’s Most Invaded Rivers

You might call us invasive reporters in England, transplants from America looking for a few good stories in the UK. While we’re minding our p’s and q’s, London is dealing with an entirely different breed of North American invaders, and they’re quickly filling up the city’s largest river. We’re talking invasive planets, fish, insects, birds,…