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Headhunt Revisited

Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Michele Westmorland, Headhunt Revisited project. In 1926, painter Caroline Mytinger and her friend, Margaret Warner, set out from San Francisco for a four-year adventure in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. With little more than $400, a few art supplies, and a trunk of clothing, they made their…

Conflict Coast: Mozambique’s Primeiras E Segundas Archipelago

Photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan Originally commissioned by WWF Words by Cara Jessop. Empty-handed, fisherman Fome Ali Buri gestures out to sea with the words “It’s over. The ocean is finished. When we fish, all we catch is sand.” Outwardly, Mozambique is a booming and prosperous country, one of the world’s fastest growing economies…

On the Trail of the Pygmy Raccoon

by Kevin Schafer / iLCP No, this is not your average raccoon.  And that, precisely, is the point of this story.  For one of the world’s most endangered carnivores has had the misfortune of looking like a common neighborhood pest – the raccoon. But the Pygmy Raccoon of Mexico’s Cozumel Island is not at all…

Photographing the End of the Kreef

Text and photographs by International League of Conservation Photographers Fellow Cheryl-Samantha Owen www.samowenphotography.com “It is currently estimated that numbers of rock lobster on the West Coast of South Africa are perilously low, at only three percent of their original pre-exploitation or pristine levels.” At 4:35 in the morning the faint glow of dawn backlit the…

What’s a Danajon Bank?

by Michael Ready, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers In April 2013, after four planes, a ferry, and two outriggers, I arrived at Handumon, a remote village and field station on Jandayan Island in the Philippines. As I lay down the first night under a mosquito net, wiped out and bit disoriented,…

Giant Amazon Dam Stalled Again – Indigenous Voices to be Heard?

If built, the Belo Monte dam in northern Brazil will be the third largest in the world.

But that is a big “if.” The Brazilian courts have suspended the $17-billion project once again, saying indigenous people whose lives would be affected by the enormous hydroelectric operation were not properly consulted.

HOW MANY GRIZZLIES ARE ENOUGH?

“Bears force us to think hard about what we really mean when we say we want to preserve nature. A sample here and there? Multitudes of certain majestic creatures but only token numbers of others – just enough to let us say we didn’t drive them completely extinct?” – Douglas H. Chadwick

Deceptive Beauties – The World of Wild Orchids

Confucius called them the “king of fragrant plants,” and John Ruskin condemned them as “prurient apparitions.” Across the centuries, orchids have captivated us with their elaborate exoticism, their powerful perfumes, and their sublime seductiveness. But the disquieting beauty of orchids is an unplanned marvel of evolution, and the story of orchids is as captivating as…

Plight of the Ice Bear

“As I stood on the deck of the Professor Khromov in the Chukchi Sea and strained to see the lone swimming polar bear buffeted by waves as she disappeared into the distance, the uncertainty of her fate weighed heavily on me. But the uncertain future of her entire species, and indeed the uncertain future facing all life on Earth, weighed on me even more.” -Jenny Ross

Redefining the fundraising landscape; Crowd Funding

“Crowd funding a project allows the photographer complete creative freedom and control over his project, which most don’t have when working for media organizations.” – Tina Ahrens, COO Emphas.is

Reduce Pollution to Our Waterways: The Chesapeake Bay

Last December, EPA issued a science-based diet that—if achieved—would reduce pollution to our waterways. Just as progress is underway, powerful forces are working to derail the recovery effort. All of us who love the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams must make our voices heard. The Scoop The Chesapeake Bay watershed covers approximately 64,000…

The Great Bear Rainforest – A view from above

“Actually being in the air and seeing the landscape from above put it into perspective. This is what we are trying to save”, said Mike Ridsdale, of the Wet’suwet’en Nation. Concealed under the boreal forests and peat bogs of northeastern Alberta lies the world’s largest deposit of bitumen, an unconventional type of petroleum that is…

Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska’s Tongass Rain Forest

One of the rarest ecosystems on Earth, the Tongass rain forest fringes the coastal panhandle of Alaska and covers thousands of islands in the Alexander Archipelago. It’s a place where humpback whales, orcas, and sea lions cruise the forested shorelines. Conservation photographer Amy Gulick spent two years paddling and trekking among the bears, misty islands, and salmon streams to document the intricate connections within the Tongass. Here she shares some of her thoughts and photos of this iconic wilderness.