National Geographic
Menu

Tag archives for Indonesia

Consumer groups slam greenwashing in sustainable palm oil marketing

Consumer groups Palm Oil Investigations of Australia (POI) and Palm Oil Consumers Action (POCA) of the United States issued a joint statement against the green-washing that is prevalent among Western brands that use palm oil in their products. The problem, as they see it, includes confusing wording and suggestive statements used by companies that try…

Sumatra Sanctuary Reports “Unexpected Density” of Tigers

It’s not often we have good news to report for the world’s remaining wild tigers. This week Panthera, a global big cat conservation organization, said a preliminary survey it helped organize had discovered an unexpected density of wild tigers in the southern section of Tambling Wildlife Nature Conservation (TWNC), a privately managed concession on Indonesia’s Sumatra island.

Of Palm Oil and Extinction

You know the old question: If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around, does it make a noise? I’m not quite sure why that question came to mind when news came out of the extinction of Dipterocarpus coriaceus, or keruing paya, in West Malaysia. Perhaps because the extinction of an iconic…

America’s Youth Tells Starbucks to Say “No” to Palm Oil!

Did you know that the world’s orangutan population has declined by more than 50 percent since 1992? And did you know that this decline is largely due to loss of habitat, notably for the development of palm oil plantations? Because of our hunger for luxury items like baked goods and cosmetics, the loss of pristine…

Petitioning Starbucks: Stop selling baked goods containing palm oil!

Save Wildlife—Pass on Starbucks Pastries This month, Izilwane–Voices for Biodiversity is teaming up with primatologist Paula Pebsworth in her campaign against Americans’ hunger for environmentally destructive palm oil. She has received a good deal of support in her work, but one notable hold out: Starbucks, a company known (perhaps surprisingly) for it social activism. Over…

February 16, 2013: Winter Mountain Climbing, Great Ape Stakeouts and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, we attempt a winter ascent of Denali for a third time, live with Idaho’s wolves for six years, and wait for months, just to capture a perfect moment in Indonesia’s jungle canopy.

Overfishing in Indonesia? What Do You Mean: I Don’t See Any Fishers!

Yes, I am lucky. I have been able to sail the waters of Eastern Indonesia over nearly 20 years, and I have dipped underwater, swimming around some incredible lagoons, reefs, and seamounts. When people ask me where to see some remote coasts I say, go anywhere east. Staring at a coastline from a boat anywhere…

January 20, 2013: Getting Attacked By a Rhino (While Riding an Elephant), Searching Far Into Space, and More

This week, we survive being attacked by a rhino while riding an elephant, we help plan South Africa’s answer to the Appalachian Trail, and we learn about the burial place of one of history’s greatest rulers – Genghis Khan.

Drudgery and Dragons – Is “Housework” Fatal to Female Komodos?

An international team of researchers has found that female Komodo dragons are living half as long as males do. The reason? “Housework.” That’s right. Housework: The physically demanding tasks of building large nests, maintaining them, and guarding their eggs are shortening the lives of female Komodo dragons. Members of the research team come from Australia,…

Nusa Penida: Black Magic Island, Part I

There exists a solemn rite that every Balinese Hindu is expected to complete at least once during this lifetime. They must make a special pilgrimage to “Nusa Penida”, the black magic island, to visit a particular temple whose energy provides negative balance to the positive side of divinity. At one time Nusa Penida was inhabited by…

September 16, 2012: Earth’s Earliest Mummies in Peru, Glacial Lakes on Mountaintops, and More

This week on “National Geographic Weekend,” join host Boyd Matson as we dodge cannibals in Indonesia, dodge polar bears while digging up dinosaur bones, educate the country’s future leaders, laugh along with hyenas in South Africa, climb mountains to save people living under glacial lakes, fight over the Ganges’ erosion in India, explore Peru’s national forests for new species, and photograph all of the units of America’s National Park System.

Google Mapping Tool Exposes Illegal Logging

Conservationists working to save forests and species on the ground are looking to the sky, thanks to mapping tools and satellites that capture Earth like never before. With video.

REDD: The New Beast in the Forest Brings Hope and Threats to Indigenous Peoples

“REDD is the new beast in the forest,” said Patrick Anderson of the Forest Peoples Programme in Indonesia here at Climate Change Mitigation with Local Communities and Indigenous peoples workshop in Cairns, Australia. Deforestation gobbles up an area the size of Greece (13 million hectares) every year. As if that loss wasn’t bad enough, it…

Photographers document endemic species of Tompotika, Sulawesi

Tompotika, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia An international team of photographers gathered on the island of Sulawesi for a Tripods in the Mud  photographic expedition in partnership with the Alliance for Tompotika Conservation / Aliansi Konservasi Tompotika (AlTo).  Joining the effort were ILCP Fellows Sandesh Kadur (India), and Kevin Schafer (USA), joined by Riza Marlon, a well-known Indonesian…

Irrawaddy Dolphins: Freshwater Species of the Week

  This is the first post in a new series that celebrates the extraordinary diversity of freshwater ecosystems around the world. Every Friday, we’ll present a new species, and examine what each can teach us about the importance of preserving, and in some cases restoring, freshwater habitats. This week, we take a look at the…