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The Coral Triangle: Amazon of the Oceans

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan. I’ve been fortunate to see most of the world’s oceans the past couple…

When I Grow Up: A Day With Our Next-Generation Monks

Lost in the adventures of the mountainous terrain in Laos, we are guided by an unexpected group of new friends with a unique, traditional upbringing.

A Hives Outbreak and Nothing Left to Lose

A hives outbreak causes a Young Explorer to use both traditional herbal remedies and Western medicine to treat her symptoms. Find out which was the winner…

Teen Pharmacist: An Unregulated Distribution of Drugs

After several injuries from a motorcycle accident, Sadia Ali ventures to a remote pharmacy to get medication. Her experience is an outstanding illustration of the pharmaceutical conditions in Laos.

The Ese’Eja: From a Cotton Thread in the Sky to Protectors of the Amazon

The Ese’Eja of the Madre de Dios Amazon region in Peru received a Genographic Project Legacy Fund grant to help preserve their culture, stories and language. As outside pressures mount and the battle with the Peruvian government over resources continues, Ese’Eja President Carlos Dejaviso Poje asks: Will our culture be here tomorrow?

A Healer’s Meridian: Where Eastern and Western Healing Intersect

When the conveniences of Western healthcare are removed, how do you treat an illness? “A Healer’s Meridian” explores the power of healing in Laos, where Eastern traditions intersect with Western treatment.

Uncontacted Indians of Acre State, Brazil

  ‘In the forest, we see with our ears,’ says José Carlos Meirelles, an expert on Brazil’s last uncontacted tribes.  During his recent expeditions into the remote rainforest of Acre state, contacted Indians told him that uncontacted Indians imitate different animals to express emotions: wild pig when they are scared, macucau bird to let people…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 5: Tribal Parks

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are slowly but surely strengthening their ability to…

A Small Tribe Thinks Big About Their Ocean Space

By Shaunna McCovey The indigenous people living on the southern Oregon coast have always understood that the ocean and its creatures must be respected. According to the tribal lore of the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw, Thunderbird was the chief of the ocean, and of all the ocean’s creatures, salmon was…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 3: Ancient Woods

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are slowly but surely strengthening their ability to cope…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 2: Enchanted Echachist

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are slowly but surely strengthening their ability to cope…

Everything is Connected | Chapter 1: Survivors

Like other indigenous First Nation communities throughout Canada, the Tla-o-qui-aht people are survivors. Over a century of cultural genocide, Christianisation, forced assimilation, land alienation and re-settlement reduced their numbers tenfold and pushed them to the brink of extinction. But despite environmental, social and cultural upheavals, the Tla-o-qui-aht are finding creative holistic solutions and restoring their…

Tribes Take the Helm in West Coast Ocean Planning

By Shaunna McCovey The Tolowa Dee-ni’ of the Smith River Rancheria in California have always been the caretakers of the ocean and coast. During the summer months, Tolowa families set up camps to fish for smelt on the local beaches. Caught smelt are elaborately arranged on the sand to dry while Tolowa fishermen and women watch…

Traditional Skills to Confront Tomorrow’s Challenges

How a small group of Pacific Islanders are working to preserve one of their most valuable assets.

Celebrating the Ingenious Skills of Tribes

From the hunting peoples of Canada to the hunter-gatherers of Africa, tribal peoples have found ingenious ways of surviving over thousands of years. For many tribal peoples, continuous immersion in nature over thousands of years has resulted in a profound attunement to the subtle cues of the natural world. Acute observations have taught tribes how…