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December 1, 2013: Running the Amazon from New Source to Sea, Fact Checking Thanksgiving and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio show, join host Boyd Matson, as he and his guests paddle the length of the Amazon River, see Jerusalem through the eyes of its citizens, debunk Thanksgiving’s creation myths, and taking selfies with tigers.

November 24, 2013: Hanging From Antarctic Cliffs, Living With Wolves and More

This week, we live for days hanging from an Antarctic cliff in high winds, then we join a Mexican circus, live with wolves for six years, and crush six tons of ivory.

Geography in the News: Roma Problems

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Europe’s Roma In late July 2010, French President Nicolas Sarkozy expelled thousands of Roma people from France. The move was widely criticized by the European Union (EU), as the move deliberately targeted one particular ethnic minority for deportation. More recently, according to Time (Nov.…

Risk and Reward for Organic and GM Farmers: A Tale of Two Villages

Here in India, sometimes it’s not the farm, but the forces behind it that make all the difference.

The Impact of Energy Development on the Environment: A Look at Wildlife with Dr. Michael Hutchins

As much as I was awed by the poverty-stricken nation of India on a recent visit, and what many westerners would consider deplorable conditions, I was impressed by the country’s “green movement,” which is rapidly emerging on the subcontinent. South Asia’s largest nation will soon surpass China as the most populated country in the world—a…

Stalking the Wild Tomato: The Ethnobotany of Genetically Modified Crops

In a place where population growth is moving incredibly fast, added pressure on farmers in India in the wake of crushing debt and failed crops calls for a new agricultural approach. Genetic modification and organic farming present promising solutions. Young Explorer Andrew Flachs will investigate the effect of both growing strategies by interviewing farmers in Southern…

The Invisible Borrowers: Opening the Door to Credit with the Mobile Phone

Individuals living in less developed parts of the world often engage in an informal economy where financial identities and credit scores are not commonly used. Little is done to keep records of financial histories, unlike the measures taken in the formal economy. In this installment of Digital Diversity, Rachel Itwaru, an intern for InVenture, explains…

September 22, 2013: Paddling the Americas, Blind Date Adventures, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, as we pursue adrenaline and white water throughout the Americas, blind date for 200 miles down Alaska’s Lost Coast, and learn to thrive despite past failures.

Iconic Ganges River Dolphin: Freshwater Species of the Week

  Conservation India reports that an endangered Ganges river dolphin (or Gangetic dolphin, Platanista gangetica gangetica), was killed by villagers in Assam this week. A fishmonger was seen selling the marine mammal’s meat at a roadside market in Lezai-Kalakhowa. The Ganges river dolphin is the national aquatic animal of India. It lives in the freshwater of the Ganges…

Geography in the News: Cobras

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM MISSING COBRA! EEEEK! The escape of a highly venomous Egyptian cobra in March 2011 forced part of the Bronx Zoo’s reptile unit to close for more than a week. The 20-inch-long (52 cm) snake was found within the zoo’s Reptile House less than 100 feet…

Genetically Modified or Organic Farming: Which Will Sustain a Growing Nation?

In the newly formed state of Telangana, India, the high-tech science of genetic modification is mediated by a 6,000 year old farming tradition. PhD candidate Andrew Flachs explores how new technologies are changing farmer lives (and how farmers are adapting new technologies to suit their needs).

Counting the Tigers That You Cannot See

Pollsters say tigers are the most popular animal species on this planet. Unfortunately, they are also among the most threatened. Wildlife biologists like me struggle to monitor the fate of surviving tiger populations.

Shedding Light in the Night: How Solar Energy and Mobile Charging Improves Quality of Life in India

In this installment of Digital Diversity, Gwen Kidera – Project Associate at S3IDF (Small Scale Sustainable Infrastructure Development Fund) – explains how their non-profit organisation provides underserved communities with Integrated Energy Centre carts (IECs) equipped with reliable solar powered lamps and mobile charging stations. Access to light and mobile technology improves the quality of life…

Indian Farmers Cope With Climate Change and Falling Water Tables

By Meha Jain, National Geographic Young Explorer Grantee Climate change is predicted to negatively impact millions of farmers across the globe, with some studies predicting up to a 40% decline in crop yields over the upcoming decades. For my dissertation, I travel to Gujarat, India, to understand how farmers are affected by and are responding…

Geography in the News: A New International Canal?

Guest Authors: Malavika Nidhi and Rahul Nagvekar, students of Mrs. Rita McMahon, Dulles High School, Sugar Land, Texas.* This invited Geography in the News article initially was posted on Maps.com’s website and was made part of its 900-article GITN archive. Permission to post here is granted by Maps.com and Neal G. Lineback and Mandy Lineback…