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Stanford: There’s No Money in Dead Bears

April 1st saw the opening of another trophy hunt season in British Columbia, a sport in which armed hunters stalk bears, moose and other selective wild game animals, killing them and retaining their paws and heads as memorial. Long considered morally unsound by scientists and conservationists, researchers are again questioning controversial industry claims that trophy…

Black Rhino Hunt Auction Won’t Help Conservation

This weekend the Dallas Safari Club (DSC) plans to auction off the chance to kill one of the world’s last black rhinos—and shockingly, the U.S. government may be okay with it despite the species’ protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.  According to DSC, which describes itself as both a pro-conservation and pro-hunting group, the…

Finding Parallels Between Two Newly Independent Countries

National Geographic grantee Riley Arthur is documenting the Erased of Slovenia- 200,000 non-ethnic Slovenian residents who were not automatically granted citizenship after the country split from Yugoslavia in 1991.  A decade later, the community is still fighting for documentation. These stories are about the Erased and the places they live.  —- Expedition Journal: Izbrisani I…

Hunting is Not a Hot Topic: An Interview with Dereck and Beverly Joubert

Wildlife filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert share their unfiltered thoughts on the end of safari hunting in Botswana.

The End of Safari Hunting in Botswana

After years of working to protect Africa’s big cats, Dereck and Beverly Joubert celebrate the last day of safari hunting in Botswana.

Caught Giant Alligators Break Records; How Big Do Gators Get?

By Ker Than Two record-setting heavyweight alligators were killed by hunters in Mississippi this weekend, just three days into the start of the official gator hunting season. One animal, a male, was 13-feet and 6.5-inches (4.13 meters) long and weighed 727 pounds (330 kilograms). “When we finally got an arrow in him, it took us…

Young People Look to Old Ways of Hunting and Gathering

Introduction to a new Young Explorer’s project: a documentary about young hunters and gatherers in Alaska.

Fish Uses Sign Language With Other Species

The coral grouper communicates with other ocean predators to find prey—a surprising ability for a fish, a new study says.

No More Hunting of Any Kind in Botswana…

The President of Botswana, Lieutenant General Ian Khama, announced recently at a public meeting in Maun, the gateway to the Okavango Delta, that no further hunting licenses would be issued from 2013, and that all hunting in Botswana would be impossible by 2014. This new ban extends to all ‘citizen hunting’ and covers all species, including…

Is Britain’s ban on lead gunshot working?

  According to a recent study, large numbers of waterfowl in the United Kingdom are being poisoned. The alleged perpetrator? Lead gunshot the birds ingest after–perhaps long after–it was initially fired. Scientists involved in the research contend that British hunters aren’t complying with laws that phased out the use of lead shot in the late…

South African Court Jails Rhino Horn Smugglers

A South African court effectively threw away the key when it jailed two smugglers convicted of trying to smuggle rhino horns out of the country. But the slaughter of the country’s pachyderms for the spurious healing power of their horns continues unchecked. A new scheme allegedly involves sex workers posing as trophy hunters seeking to harvest rhino horns through a legal loophole.

Excuse Me, Is This Your Bear Urine? – Only at National Geographic

Last week a group email went out to the staff of National Geographic. This is what it said: “A package arrived at Geo…(talk about weird) 2 small bottles of Pee. Bear Urine. No… really. Can you please send a blast to see if some brave soul will claim the urine.”

Hunting Records Track UK Game Populations Over Centuries

Gamebag records have been recognized as useful population indicators by British biologists for over a century. Analyzing bag records and taking five- and ten-year averages provide comparisons of performance between moors, the ability to assess the implementation of management practices, such as heather burning (muirburn), and a window on the cyclical pattern of grouse diseases like strongyle worm.

Ancient “Desert Kites” Funneled Gazelles into Killing Pits, Study Finds

As long as 6,000 years ago the people of the Middle East were using a system of stone structures to funnel thousands of migrating gazelles and other animals into traps where they could be killed and butchered, a new study has determined. “Humans may have driven a species of gazelle to the brink of extinction…