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Corridors to Survival: Charting a Path to Combat Climate Change in the Tropics

New findings from Woods Hole Research Center scientists use satellite data to recommend habitat corridors between protected areas in the tropics to promote long-term conservation. The concept of habitat corridors in conservation has been around for a while. It’s a topic at global climate talks and an issue for NGOs eager to create pathways for…

Can Green Replace Gold When it Comes to REDD?

Warsaw climate talks give surprise boost to a struggling UN plan to provide incentives to reduce deforestation Chris Meyer sounded cautiously optimistic on the phone a few days ago. He’s had plenty of time to reflect on the two-week UN climate negotiations in Warsaw in November. Those talks yielded only modest progress on a range…

December 29, 2013: Rescuing Crocs, Navy Seals in Zoos, Swimming with Great Whites, Blackfish and More

Join host National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson and his guests as they try to save man-eating crocs from angry villagers, meet a retired Navy seal at Washington’s National Zoo, find out the dark secrets of performing orcas at Sea World, swim face to face with great white sharks, and survive avalanches by avoiding them.

Geography in the News: Polar Bears

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Polar Bears on the Run The world’s polar bears are becoming more and more threatened, not from predation, as they have no natural predators except humans, but from global warming. A book entitled On Thin Ice: The Changing World of the Polar Bear by…

December 15, 2013: Paddling Through The World’s Biggest Rapids, Swimming in the World’s Coldest Oceans and More

This week, on National Geographic Weekend, host Boyd Matson joins guests as they paddle the world’s biggest rapids, dive in the world’s coldest oceans (at both poles), and walk “Out of Eden,” chasing our early human ancestors to the ends of the Earth.

“Sea Snot” Explosions Feed Deep-Sea Creatures

A mix of dead animals and their feces that float down to the seafloor help keep deep-sea organisms alive, a new study says.

The Promise of REDD: Giving Tropical Countries a Choice in Whether to Decimate Their Forests

A U.N. program to reduce emissions faces stiff obstacles as it seeks to gain momentum in Warsaw A cruel irony of climate change is that countries that ring the equator – most of them poor and eager to develop – possess an incredibly valuable asset that they can only monetize if they destroy it: their…

October 6, 2013: Throwing Axes Like a Lumberjack, Wolves Feeding Grizzlies, and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, we row through a quickly thawing Northwest Passage, then we throw axes with a champion lumberjack, and finally, we snap pictures with National Geographic’s head of photography.

Glacier National Park Prepares for Ice-Free Future

Text and photos by Allie Goldstein and Kirsten Howard Our hike up to Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park winds through alpine meadows, along the edge of ice-cut cliffs, up a waterfall staircase, and around a stubborn ram. The views are breathtaking in the most literal sense of that word. The three lakes filling the…

June 2, 2013: Skiing Down Everest, Chasing Ice (and Oscars), and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio show, host Boyd Matson chats with photographer Jimmy Chin about skiing down Everest while looking for the perfect picture, glacier explorer and photographer James Balog about documenting the rapid change in the planet’s frozen fields, “Jetman” Yves Rossy about strapping four jet engines to his back and jumping out of an airplane, and gear guru Steve Casimiro about what to bring camping for this summer.

Top 10 Headlines Today: Clones Become Stem Cells, Oldest Water Found…

The top 10 stories on our radar today: Scientists have created stem cells from cloned human embryos, 1.5-billion-year-old water has been found in a deep Canadian mine, and…

Explosive Agriculture and That Larger April Fireball

Two days after the Boston Marathon bombing, a humongous explosion rocked the Texas town of West when a fire broke out at an agriculture retail facility storing ammonium nitrate. 14 people were killed, more than 200 injured, but despite leaving a crater 93 feet wide and 10 feet deep, the incident played second fiddle in…

Geography in the News: Maple Syrup Time

By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com SUGAR TIME IN NEW ENGLAND Sugar maple are tapped in New England and 2013 may be a better year for the maple syrup industry after several declining years. Maple syrup, that sweet sticky syrup that makes mere pancakes incredibly delicious, is threatened…

RISE: Climate Change and Coastal Communities

By Claire Schoen Media Most of the great cities, the world over, are built along the water. So are many towns, hamlets, and villages. But sea level rise and extreme weather, both fueled by climate change, threaten to reclaim coastal lands and the communities that are built on them. The destruction of New York’s shoreline,…

Unique Alaskan Orcas Slip Toward Extinction

One spill-echoing artwork, a ceramic wall-mounted sculpture called “Eyak’s Jaw,” was made in remembrance of the 20th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Within a rich bed of intertidal life forms – sea start, kelps, and urchins, a viewer glimpses the jawbone and conical teeth of an orca. The actual jawbone of the male…